Quick, You Have Mail

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), November 16, 2010 | Go to article overview

Quick, You Have Mail


GRRR! Information rage is spreading like a disease in workplaces across the nation as frustrated workers struggle under a torrent of unnecessary emails.

A LexisNexis survey of 1700 white collar workers found 49% felt dejected and frustrated at being unable to manage all the information that came their way at work, and said if the amount of information they received continued to increase, 51% would soon reach a "breaking point" where they couldn't handle any more.

The report also found that Australian workers were the most likely to admit the amount of information they had to manage for their jobs had increased in the past five years (92%), with two-thirds (65%) saying it had increased significantly.

Australians spend more time receiving and managing information (54%) than actually using that information (46%).

An even 50% said only half of the information they received actually helped them get their job done, and 88% wished they could spend less time organising, and more time using, the information that came their way.

Meanwhile another survey, this time from IBM, found most managers think too many irrelevant emails cause a stressful workplace.

Unanswered emails, constantly responding to emails or sending an email to the wrong person all contribute.

So how do some of our most well-known businesspeople treat emails?

NOEL WHITTAKER

The fact I am answering this so soon (within an hour) shows you what an email desperate I am. I guess I am just addicted to email. Even when I am stopped at traffic lights, I am checking them on the Blackberry.

At least I keep a very tidy inbox and the benefit of my addiction is that people who email me get very fast service.

CAROLYN THOMSON

Kadoe Commercial Coatings, 2010 Caloundra business person of the year. Emails are essential to our level of professionalism and quick turnaround time for our clients.

I delegate as much as possible to the relevant areas in our business. The balance are sorted into separate folders to get them out of my inbox and then dealt with at the appropriate, required time. …

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