Like a Diamond

Manila Bulletin, November 28, 2010 | Go to article overview

Like a Diamond


MANILA, Philippines - Here is another story from our friend who finds joy in sharing stories about the Gospel through the e-mail. I am reproducing the story in full.* * *The story is told of a South African farmer who disliked his occupation and envied those who were in the diamond business. Farming provided a meager existence but those who discovered diamonds seemed to live a life of luxury. Accordingly, he sold his poor farm and joined countless others in search of diamonds. Soon after, he hit tough times, became financially ruined, and committed suicide.* * *Meanwhile, the new owner who bought the farm, came across an unusual stone as he toiled in his farm. He carried the stone home, put it on his mantle, and consequently forgot about it.* * *One day, a friend dropped by and noticed this unusual stone. With permission, he took it to a dealer and to their surprise, the stone turned out to be one of the largest diamonds ever discovered and the poor farm was transformed into a huge diamond mine. If only our first farmer friend had been more patient!* * *Too many adventurers, not content with their heritage, run to distant rainbows in pursuit of their dreams of happiness. In Matthew 6:19-21, Jesus encouraged His followers not to store up treasures on earth which can decay or be stolen. Rather, store up treasures in heaven that have lasting value. Your heart will be where your treasure is.* * *Our lives can be compared to diamonds in many ways. A diamond, when found, looks dull and rough. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Like a Diamond
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.