Lisa Jackson: 'The EPA Is Not the Villain'

By Stone, Daniel | Newsweek, December 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

Lisa Jackson: 'The EPA Is Not the Villain'


Stone, Daniel, Newsweek


Byline: Daniel Stone

On Jan. 1, the Environmental Protection Agency is set to phase in regulations on air and water pollutants, including sulfur oxides, ozone, and, most controversial of all, carbon dioxide. House Republicans have vowed to thwart the EPA at every turn. But Lisa Jackson, the agency's administrator, says she won't be deterred. She sat down with NEWSWEEK's Daniel Stone. Excerpts:

People have said you run, and i'm quoting, a "runaway agency," with a staff that's "out of control," and have called you a "renegade." what's your response? I think we need to separate what we're doing from what we hear lobbyists and CEOs say we're doing. We laid out three ideas: we would follow the law, and we would follow science, and we would operate transparently. When I hear "renegade," it sounds like we're operating outside of the system. But this is the system. The system is designed to make sure our land and water and air are protected.

House Republicans have said they're going to subpoena you every week. What will be your defense? I can offer facts. I'll explain all the rules and proposals that are out there, what they do, and how they'll protect the environment and health of the American people. We're not doing it without being mindful that the economy is in tight straits.

Would there be room for a compromise to push all these regulations back one or two years? I'm not saying there's no accommodation that can be made with respect to time. But these regulations are designed to give time and certainty so that industry can plan. I had a CEO in here last week who thanked me for the clean-car rules. He said they were absolutely key, if not the catalyst, to make his industry expand. …

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Lisa Jackson: 'The EPA Is Not the Villain'
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