Islands in the Sun; It Is Not Surprising That the Caribbean Is Seen as the Ultimate Destination for Cruising. See Some of the World's Loveliest Islands While Basking in Brilliant Sunshine

Daily Mail (London), November 30, 2010 | Go to article overview

Islands in the Sun; It Is Not Surprising That the Caribbean Is Seen as the Ultimate Destination for Cruising. See Some of the World's Loveliest Islands While Basking in Brilliant Sunshine


THE crystal-clear waters and pure white sands of the Caribbean provide the perfect cruise escape from the depths of the British winter. And there could be no better way to travel than on board the streamlined Royal Caribbean International ship Jewel of the Seas.

Combine the stylish mid-size cruise ship with an exotic cocktail of Caribbean islands and highlights of Latin America and you have the ideal 11-night sun-kissed getaway.

Flying conveniently from London Heathrow or Manchester to Miami for an overnight hotel stay, you transfer the next day to join Jewel of the Seas in Fort Lauderdale, departing on a southerly course for the sun.

At 90,090 tonnes, Jewel of the Seas is so well designed you don't ever feel that you are sharing your ship with 2,100 other passengers.

The fourth in a series of modern Radiance-class vessels, Jewel of the Seas boasts 13 decks of activity, entertainment and accommodation options.

Royal Caribbean's signature rock-climbing wall features alongside a mini-golf course, state-of-the-art fitness centre, health and beauty spa, a solarium and swimming pool with retractable glass roof and cascading waterfalls. There's a choice of five alternative dining venues including Italian dining at the classy Portofino and Chops Grille restaurants.

Coupled with these on-board innovations is a vast Adventure Ocean area designed to amuse children aged between three and 17 when they're not splashing about in the two pools.

FINDING YOUR SEA LEGS

WITH two days at sea on leaving the Florida shoreline, there's ample time to get acclimatised to the ship, which features an impressive nine-deck-high atrium complete with glasswalled elevators which provide stunning sea views as they travel between the 12 decks.

The ship has a large proportion of cabins with balconies and windows, giving a feeling of space and comfort as you relax into life at sea before arriving at the first of five exciting ports of call. First up is charming Oranjestad, the historic Dutch capital of Aruba. Visitors can enjoy beautiful beaches, excellent snorkelling and teeming marine life, best seen by taking a submarine 150ft under the ocean to view multi-coloured coral reefs and shipwrecks.

Cobbled streets and pastel plazas make colonial Cartagena in Colombia one of Latin America's most photogenic cities. Founded in 1533, the city is steeped in history, with a location that made it a popular port for plunderers and pirates. Today, thrill seekers will find a classic mix of old and new with a twist of island attitude. …

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Islands in the Sun; It Is Not Surprising That the Caribbean Is Seen as the Ultimate Destination for Cruising. See Some of the World's Loveliest Islands While Basking in Brilliant Sunshine
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