Youth Master Plans Guide Action in Nashville, Grand Rapids and Berkeley

By Karpman, Michael | Nation's Cities Weekly, November 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Youth Master Plans Guide Action in Nashville, Grand Rapids and Berkeley


Karpman, Michael, Nation's Cities Weekly


The ability to employ scarce local resources effectively is an important factor in the success of efforts to improve child well-being, particularly in communities where service delivery is fragmented among numerous city and county agencies, schools and nonprofits.

More than two dozen cities have dealt with this challenge by establishing "youth master plans" to better coordinate programs and services for young people. By adapting this concept from land use, economic development and parks and recreation planning, municipal leaders set in motion a process for engaging the community to develop shared objectives and outcomes for children and youth.

In recent months, three cities--Nashville, Tenn.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; and Berkeley, Calif.--.have moved forward with new youth master plans, each completing a goal 'set as part of their participation in the Mayors' Action Challenge for Children and Families (www.mayorsforkids.org).

"Our most precious community asset is our children," said Grand Rapids Mayor George Heartwell. "I am honored to join my colleagues from across the nation to set forth bold, new goals to collectively support our children now for a brighter future."

Nashville

Last February, Nashville Mayor Karl Dean brought together 52 community leaders, including youth, for the first meeting of a Child and Youth Master Plan task force. Co-chaired by Councilmember-At-Large Ronnie Steine and coordinated by the Mayor's Office of Children and Youth, the task force established five committees to focus on health, safety, out-of-school time, education, and mobility and stability for young people from birth to adulthood.

"The intent of the master plan was to look beyond what takes place in the classroom from kindergarten to 12th grade and examine the many community and home life factors that impact our children's overall well-being and success," said Mayor Dean.

"In Nashville, we are blessed to have many organizations and individuals doing great work, but we've discovered incremental approaches wouldn't get us where we want to be, so the Child and Youth Master Plan is designed to tie together all our hopes, dreams and intentions into one document," said Councilmember Steine. "The plan puts us all on the same page so we can move forward together to accomplish common, agreed-upon goals."

Over a six-month period, the planning committees conducted 10 community listening sessions throughout Davidson County, surveyed more than 1,200 high school students and 800 adults, conducted several focus groups with youth and hosted a Mayor's Youth Summit with students from nearly every local high school. In July, the task force announced a plan consisting of 14 desired outcomes, each linked to specific research findings, objectives and strategies, and informed by the Forum for Youth Investment's Ready By 21 Challenge.

One bold new initiative will be the creation of the Nashville Family Connections Center (NFCC) to reduce the number of children and youth exposed to family violence. Modeled after the Family Justice Center approach of co-locating and coordinating multi-disciplinary services under one roof, NFCC will focus on domestic violence, child abuse, delinquency prevention, intervention and family support. NFCC follows a collaborative model similar to the Metro Student Attendance Center. Launched by the city in 2008, the Attendance Center has reduced truancy by more than 17 percent.

Key NFCC partners will include the police department, district attorney's office, Tennessee Department of Children's Services, Metro Social Services, juvenile court and nonprofit advocacy groups.

"Children who are abused or exposed to domestic violence are much more likely to participate in criminal behavior themselves," said Mayor Dean. "This center will allow us to intervene early and effectively and, as a result, reduce the cyclical pattern of family violence in our community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Youth Master Plans Guide Action in Nashville, Grand Rapids and Berkeley
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.