Diversity Dialogue: Lockheed Martin's Innovative Postcard Campaign Gets Employees Talking

By Baier, Kathy | Communication World, September-October 2008 | Go to article overview

Diversity Dialogue: Lockheed Martin's Innovative Postcard Campaign Gets Employees Talking


Baier, Kathy, Communication World


Lockheed Martin, one of the world's leading advanced technology companies, is facing a mammoth demographic problem: Many of its 70,000 engineers are expected to retire within the next 15 years. For the past three years, President and CEO Robert J. Stevens has emphasized that the company must create a workforce that is more diverse and inclusive, not only of racial differences but also differences in beliefs, backgrounds and experiences.

In 2007, the Lockheed Martin MS2 (Maritime Systems & Sensors) employee communication and design team determined it needed to find a way to help employees understand the nuances of an inclusive work environment. The solution centered on an innovative "Embrace Diversity" print postcard campaign: All 13,000 MS2 employees would receive a series of three postcards over four months that would encourage discussion of various topics.

Goals and objectives

The overall objective was to create a communication tool that not only captured the attention of employees but also got them to think about their own beliefs. This required an eye-catching design paired with bold, edgy language. The goals were:

* To engage employees by providing vibrant, consistent and relevant diversity information to increase employee understanding and acceptance of inclusive behavior.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

* To set the stage for greater employee involvement and engagement in both diversity communication and the company's efforts to create a diverse, inclusive work environment. Two key objectives were:

* To reach at least 75 percent of employees with the targeted diversity postcard series.

* To establish a solid baseline of employee understanding about what constitutes a diverse environment.

Solution and implementation

The Embrace Diversity postcard campaign consisted of 12 different postcards that explored themes such as generational differences, cultural and religious traditions, and military experience. The team decided on this approach for several reasons:

* Employees receive very little print material from the internal communication team. Thus, the team believed a print piece would stand out from the electronic overload many employees experience.

* Multiple postcards could be created, with a selection of postcards distributed each month. This allowed the team to explore more than just a handful of issues.

* The postcards could be sorted so that employees seated in adjacent offices or cubicles received different versions, encouraging conversation about the topics.

The intent was to explore the beliefs and backgrounds that contribute to an inclusive work environment by presenting realistic scenarios. The design used "conversation bubbles"--similar to those in comic strips--to present thoughts and reactions. The team wanted to avoid using stock photography or illustrations that included pictures of people in order to have employees focus on the issues and language, not on gender or race. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Diversity Dialogue: Lockheed Martin's Innovative Postcard Campaign Gets Employees Talking
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.