Military Policy Doesn't Make Sense

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

Military Policy Doesn't Make Sense


Military policy doesn't make sense

I'm not sure I understand the reasoning behind the policy of "don't ask don't tell." Do people normally ask? I personally don't ask every person I meet, and I think most people don't ask and most people don't tell. Then why would you ask every military official that question? So if 70 percent of the military doesn't care or think that it is dangerous, let's just forget about the policy and leave it up to the individuals to not discuss. For goodness' sake, it takes fewer senators to get a bill to the floor for a vote; why does it take more than 70 percent of the military for this to be repealed?

Lesley Wexler

Libertyville

Airline security would anger Orwell

There is a growing backlash about the recent airport scanning measures put in place just before the peak flying period between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day.

The American people remain conflicted over the invasive new scanning methods. Some say that we are spoiled brats, that we have forgotten about 9/11, that we don't understand the threats we face from terrorists, and that the government is entitled to check under our clothing after the "underwear bomber" threat. Those Americans who honor our constitution as a document which has imparted truth and wisdom down through the ages are drawn to the Fourth Amendment: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated. . . "

The Fourth Amendment doesn't cede to government the right to search for any reason in our country unless there is probable cause that the person has committed a crime and there is a warrant.

It is past time for common sense. …

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