Commemorating the Founding of the Royal Canadian Legion

By Canada, Parks | Manitoba History, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Commemorating the Founding of the Royal Canadian Legion


Canada, Parks, Manitoba History


On 12 June 2010 the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada hosted a ceremony to commemorate the founding of The Royal Canadian Legion in November 1925. The event was held in conjunction with The Royal Canadian Legion's 43rd Dominion Convention on Smith Street, Winnipeg, directly in front of the Marlborough Hotel, the site of the organization's founding as well as its first Dominion Convention. Since its establishment seven years after the end of the First World War, The Royal Canadian Legion has remained Canada's largest veteran-based social and advocacy organization.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The ceremony was attended by, among others, the Minister of Veterans Affairs, the Hon. Jean-Pierre Blackburn, Mr. Wilf Edmond, Dominion President of The Royal Canadian Legion, and Dr. Robert O'Kell, Manitoba Member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada.

The Royal Canadian Legion

The First World War is widely held to be a landmark in Canadian national development. Although she entered the war in 1914 as a colony, by 1918 Canada was emerging as a nation in her own right. The young nation underwent many trials, one of which was the repatriation of hundreds of thousands of returning servicemen.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Of the Allied forces, Canada was a leader in devising plans for the retraining of disabled soldiers. In addition, this country's pension rates were among the most generous in the world. In short, Ottawa had prepared for returning Canadian armies with a care and foresight that was virtually unique among the combatting nations.

Despite its best intentions, however, Ottawa was unable to address all the needs of the returning servicemen. As a result, several small associations of ex-soldiers banded together throughout the country in an effort to provide comradeship and help with medical and financial needs not provided by the Crown.

The founding meeting of the Canadian Legion of the British Empire Service League (later renamed The Royal Canadian Legion) took place at the Marlborough Hotel, 331 Smith Street, Winnipeg, from 25 to 27 November 1925. That meeting led to the establishment of Canada's largest veteran-based social, service and advocacy organization. Founded on the twin pillars of loyalty and comradeship, the Legion's primary purpose since inception has been service to the veteran (and his or her dependents) and perpetuating the memory of those who served. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Commemorating the Founding of the Royal Canadian Legion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.