Obama's Contempt of Congress; President Bullies Senate over New START Signing

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 7, 2010 | Go to article overview

Obama's Contempt of Congress; President Bullies Senate over New START Signing


Byline: Frank J. Gaffney Jr., SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Even for a man known for his arrogance, President Obama's treatment of the Senate in connection with the New START Treaty is astounding. His demand that senators approve this defective accord during the few days remaining in the lame-duck session amounts to contempt of Congress. It must not be tolerated, let alone rewarded.

To be sure, Mr. Obama is not the first chief executive to hold the legislative branch in low esteem. Still, his highhandedness when it comes to the constitutional responsibility of the Senate to play a real role in treaty-making seems particularly contemptuous - and contemptible.

The Obama administration's insistence that senators accede to his efforts to relegate them to rubber stamps is without precedent. As a bipartisan group of 15 former senators observed recently, never before in the history of the U.S. Senate has the deliberation and vote on an arms-control agreement been truncated by being conducted during a lame-duck session.

The effort to ram the treaty through before Christmas is no more justified than it is precedented. The claim being made by the administration and its surrogates that uncertainty about Russian activities necessitates such haste is laughable.

It turns out, the real need for verification lies elsewhere - namely, in establishing what Team Obama has given away with respect to missile defense in the course of negotiating New START and in the months since that treaty was signed. Last week, The Washington Times' ace national security editor, Bill Gertz, revealed that the administration had been caught lying to senators concerned about yet another agreement being developed with the Russians. Apparently, it would go beyond the undesirable limitations on U.S. anti-missile systems - both direct and indirect - that are incorporated into the present accord. In a marvelous essay at National Review Online, former federal prosecutor Andrew C. McCarthy demonstrates the reality and undesirability of those limitations.

The Obama administration has tried to allay concerns about any new negotiations by saying it is simply building on talks the George W. Bush administration previously held with Moscow on missile-defense cooperation. As former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Keith Payne, who headed up the U.S. delegation to those talks, pointed out to a Capitol Hill audience last week, his explicit instructions were not to discuss (let alone agree to) limits of any kind on our anti-missile capabilities. It is hard to imagine a more different agenda than that of Mr. Obama - whose ideologically driven antipathy to such defenses seems about as deep-seated as his disdain for those in Congress who have sought to protect Americans against ballistic-missile attack. …

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