The Oberlin Conservatory Library

By Campana, Deborah | Notes, December 2010 | Go to article overview

The Oberlin Conservatory Library


Campana, Deborah, Notes


The Oberlin Conservatory Library has received the collection of Frederick (Eric) R. Selch (1930-2002) given by his wife, Patricia Bakwin Selch, and their family. While Eric Selch established a distinguished career in advertising for the J. Walter Thompson agency in Britain from the mid 50s to the mid 70s, he began collecting musical instruments and books, traveling often and acquiring instruments, books, and artwork along the way. The Selch collection contains instruments and writings representing all corners of the world, but American music is its focus. At the time of Eric's passing in 2002, he had amassed a collection of 700 instruments as well as 6,000 books, manuscripts, and printed music, together with paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs that depict the history, design and use of musical instruments. "Although he took pride in not paying excessive prices for instruments, he spent lavishly when necessary to obtain a book that would fill a gap in his library," according to Laurence Libin, curator of musical instruments at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in his foreword to The Legacy of Sebastian Virdung: An Illustrated Catalogue of Rare Books from the Frederick R. Selch Collection (p. x). Two examples include: Heinrich Loritus's (better known as Glareanus) treatise, Dodecachordon (Basel, 1547), a treatise in part that explores a system of ecclesiastical modes, and which in turn, influenced such writers as Gioseffo Zarlino, whose Istitutioni Harmoniche (Venice, 1558) can also be found in Selch's collection (catalog, pp.18-21). In addition to exhibits at the Grolier Club, selections from the Selch collection have been displayed at the Goethe Institute in Boston, the University of Chicago, and the Philip Morris branch of the Whitney Museum of American Art among others. In 1971, Selch helped found the American Musical Instrument Society and its journal, serving as the society's president 1977-81. In 1976, he instituted and performed in the Federal Music Society, a twenty-six-member ensemble specializing in music of the American Colonial-Federal period (1775-1830) that played over seventy concerts in the decade of its existence. From 1983 to 1989, he was the owner, editor, and publisher of the monthly music magazine, Ovation. The legacy of Eric Selch will be celebrated not only through his collection, but also through an endowed professorship of musicology and the institution of the Frederick R. Selch Center for American Music at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music.

Recently President Barack Obama awarded the 2009 National Medal of the Arts to the Oberlin Conservatory in recognition of the wealth and depth of its creative expressions. This spring marked another milepost in Conservatory history when a fourth building was added to the complex. Noted for its gold LEED standard design and as the new home for the Conservatory's jazz program and recording studio, the Bertram and Judith Kohl Building will also house the Conservatory Library's special collections in a specially-designed vault. The Kohl Building was dedicated during the first weekend in May with events including presentations and concerts by Stevie Wonder and Bill and Camille Cosby who also received honorary doctorates from the college.

DEBORAH CAMPANA

Oberlin Conservatory Library

From the new editor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Oberlin Conservatory Library
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.