Comparing SPED and Regular Classes

Manila Bulletin, December 13, 2010 | Go to article overview

Comparing SPED and Regular Classes


Question: Good day! I just want to ask the difference in terms of admissions, teachings, curriculum, class setup and materials used in the SPED Class as compared to a regular class. Thank you! - SarahEach child has a right to an education. The purpose and goals of education are essential for all children, while the techniques required to helping children with special needs to progress are different and designed according to their unique characteristics.Admissions, teaching, curriculum, class setup and materials for SPEd classes are not very different from regular schools. But they are usually modified for children with special needs through accommodation, adaptation, augmentation and alteration.The information below is for selected children with special needs and will let you visualize why and how special education is designed for them. (Handbook on Special Education and Policies and Guidelines for Special Education)Admission: Child with special needs (CSN) shall enjoy equality of access to formal and nonformal education. Among the salient points are the following:1. All schools at the preschool, elementary, secondary and tertiary levels shall admit children and youth with special needs2. The school entrance age of a child with special needs to formal academic shall follow the current regulation of the Department of Education. The child may be admitted any time during the school year, if circumstances warrant such admission. Neither age requirement nor time limitation shall be imposed for attendance to nonformal education programs.3. An assessment test to determine proper grade placement shall be administered to special students who cannot present school credential. Their admission shall be subject to the approval of the proper school administrators.4. Overage students assessed by the Philippine Educational Placement Test (PEPT) but found deficient in communication and other skills shall be admitted provided that they shall undergo remedial instruction in the areas of deficiency.5. Adaptations in the administration of college entrance tests and other examinations given by DepEd and other agencies shall provide to meet the needs of special students.Teaching strategies: The methods of teaching utilized in the education of children with special needs are determined by their needs, abilities and interests with present curriculum as guide:Blind - Individualization, use of concrete objects and experiences, unified multisensory instruction approach, additional stimulation, self-activity, orientation and mobility, Braille readingDeaf - Strategies for teaching communication skills are: oral-aural method, manual method: pantomime, natural gesture, sign language, manual alphabet or finger spelling, simultaneous methods or combined method - using both oral-aural and manual method, cued speech, total communication. Approaches for teaching language: natural approach, Tadoma method or vibration method, multi-sensory approach, grammatical approach called Barry Five Slate system, Fitzgerald KeyCSN with Intellectual Disabilities - Unit teaching approach, clinical teaching, task analysis, diagnostic-prescriptive teaching, behavior modification, learning disability approach, arts and crafts approach, Montessori approach, differentiated teaching, self-directed teaching, chaining and shaping approach, direct instruction, experiential learning, team teaching, cooperative learning.Children with Autism, ADHD, Emotional and Behavioral Disorders - Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS), TEEACH, Behavior Modification Approach, Applied Behavior Analysis, Positive Behavior Support, Functional Behavior Analysis. The teaching strategies for children with mental/intellectual disabilities can also be adopted.Learning Disability - Reading Strategies: Bloomfield Approach, Fries Approach, The Gibson-Richards LinguisticApproach, Alphabetical Approach, Phonic approach, Phonovisual method, semantic webbingGifted and Talented - Multiple Intelligence Techniques, Brainstorming, Semantic Webbing, Research method, Creative Reading Technique, Writing Book Report, Value Strategies. …

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