Dolan Invites with BBQ and a Beer

By Allen, John L., Jr. | National Catholic Reporter, November 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

Dolan Invites with BBQ and a Beer


Allen, John L., Jr., National Catholic Reporter


Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York has had a stunningly swift and sure rise up the ecclesial ladder. His Nov. 16 election as president of the U.S. bishops' conference is the latest indication that the 60-year-old Dolan has arrived.

Observers say Dolan blends a set of personal qualities that would make him a leader in any era, with a theological and political outlook ideally suited for a body of bishops shaped by 30 years of appointments from Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI.

He's known as affable, with a lively sense of humor; he's a quintessential "John Paul II bishop," combining doctrinal orthodoxy with a natural gift for communication in an age when media savvy is at a premium.

Dolan is also a bridge-builder, whose defining quality may be a Will Rogers-esque inclination to like everybody he meets. His metaphor for relationships is his late father's backyard barbecue pit, where he says he learned that "there's almost nobody that if you eyeball them, have a beer with them and really start talking, with whom you would not find a common bond."

Dolan was born in February 1950 and grew up in Ballwin, Mo., a St. Louis suburb, the oldest of five children in an Irish-Catholic family. He entered the minor seminary in 1964 and never looked back, at a time when many priests and seminarians struggled with their vocations.

In the 1970s, Dolan studied at the North American College in Rome, where he fell under the spell of Msgr. John Tracy Ellis, the distinguished American church historian. Dolan went on to earn a doctorate in church history, setting him apart from many bishops whose academic formation is in dogmatic theology or canon law. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dolan Invites with BBQ and a Beer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.