Towards More Effective Vocational Training

Manila Bulletin, December 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Towards More Effective Vocational Training


MANILA, Philippines - Vocational Schools have always been part of our Educational System. They were established to answer the need to teach and develop job specific skills particularly for those unable to pursue higher education. Today, the shift of enrolment to these short courses are very evident as more and more parents find tuition fees of higher educational institutions no longer affordable.

Government saw the need to use the system to hone the expertise of our skilled labor hence the establishment of TESDA (Technical Education and Skills Development Authority) and privately initiated vocational schools like the Meralco Foundation and Dual Tech. In these institutions, they train people to become better prepared workers and give them opportunities for employment in both local and international companies. Most of our graduates often land good jobs abroad and are much sought after by multinationals in the manufacturing sector, auto assembly and even construction.

Over the years, the objectives of these vocational schools have evolved. There has been a lot of changes in the course offerings in the past five decades. Traditionally, vocational studies were focused on purely vocational skills training such as steno typing, secretarial programs, tailoring and hairdressing courses. Today, there is a wide range of highly technical and specialized courses to choose from such as Computer programming, drafting, automotive technology , nursing aide training, photography and even para-legal to name a few. In the more innovative schools, the purely vocational and technical courses and trainings are being expanded to include the development of the academic aspect of education. In fact, some programs are ladderized, so that units taken for a specific course may be credited in case the student decides to enroll in a related field/professional course in a college or university. …

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