History Strikes Yet Again; Big Storms Come Back to Haunt Us

Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia), December 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

History Strikes Yet Again; Big Storms Come Back to Haunt Us


Byline: Tracey Joynson

MARYBOROUGH'S Ray Hewitt was wondering if history would repeat itself this week.

Yesterday marked 44 years since a massive hail storm hit the city and that was 44 years after a hail storm swept through Wondai and district on December 14, 1922.

Weatherzone meteorologists yesterday were predicting storms with just a chance of hail.

Mr Hewitt said the sky was black and green before the hail storm hit on December 17, 1966, damaging almost every fibro roof in Maryborough.

It even put dents in the corrugated iron roof of his house in Cheapside Street, which he still lives in today.

"I'll never forget it," Mr Hewitt said.

He said three panes of glass and about a dozen louvres were smashed by hail ricocheting from next door.

Mr Hewitt kept one stone Co bigger than a cricket ball and made up of marble-sized balls fused together Co in the freezer for six months to show visitors.

He said cars took cover under shop awnings and high-blocked houses when the hail hit.

Mr Hewitt said plumbers had work for about two years fixing damaged roofs and panelbeaters were the same.

"They tyre companies would have got a bit of a spin-off too because you couldn't drive down Kent Street without getting a puncture from all the nails that had fallen off trailers taking roofing material to the Granville dump," he said. …

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History Strikes Yet Again; Big Storms Come Back to Haunt Us
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