Obama's Regulatory Power Grab; FCC Internet Ruling Offers a Taste of Things to Come

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 27, 2010 | Go to article overview

Obama's Regulatory Power Grab; FCC Internet Ruling Offers a Taste of Things to Come


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama on Tuesday used the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to impose government controls over the Internet. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski's implementation of so-called net neutrality regulations offers a foretaste of the White House's shift to rule by unelected bureaucracy now that Republicans have regained control of the House of Representatives.

For the first time ever, the FCC will regulate the way Internet companies are allowed to do business in the same way that the agency regulates 19th-century technologies such as the telephone. The red tape is being offered in the name of protecting Internet freedom and prohibiting companies from unreasonable discrimination. The rhetoric sounds good, but there are no significant examples that such discrimination is taking place. Moreover, there is no reason to think the free market would be incapable of resolving any future difficulties.

Innovation has thrived online precisely because Uncle Sam has not yet stepped in with his usual mix of crushing taxation and arbitrary rules. That all changes with the FCC's latest action. Mr. Genachowski is asserting control over the Internet without any legal authority for his actions. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in April rejected a previous FCC attempt at imposing net-neutrality rules. Congress has not given the FCC this responsibility. Agencies like the FCC have no business making law, but Mr. Genachowski seems to think constitutional limitations don't apply.

If the public is uncomfortable with having government bureaucrats redesign the way they are allowed to access the Internet, not much can be done about it. …

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Obama's Regulatory Power Grab; FCC Internet Ruling Offers a Taste of Things to Come
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