Ban Homosexuals from National Guard; States Have Power to Block Obama's Social Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 29, 2010 | Go to article overview

Ban Homosexuals from National Guard; States Have Power to Block Obama's Social Policy


Byline: Bob Marshall, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama supported repealing Don't Ask, Don't Tell, ending 232 years of American military policy, going back to George Washington, that prohibited persons who engage in homosexual behavior from serving in our armed services.

This radical policy vote came on a small-business technology bill while Americans were Christmas shopping on a Saturday afternoon by lame-duck representatives who had been repudiated at the November elections by voters. No amendments were allowed. The vote was hailed as a victory for tolerance. This is a moral sea change supported by Congress.

Sen. Joe Lieberman, Connecticut independent, cited the Declaration of Independence, and Sen. Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, said repeal of DADT represented the ideals of the Founders of the Constitution. In 1776, sodomy was a felony in all the colonies, and a felony in all the states in 1789.

The administration and Congress feigned concern for what the troops thought about repealing DADT. The Pentagon Working Group acknowledged they did not conduct a poll of whether service members think 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' should be repealed .. it was not our mission to conduct such a referendum of Service members Yet, the Pentagon Working Group conceded, Our sense is that the majority of views expressed were against repeal. (p. 49)

Mr. Obama spoke about tolerating sexual orientation, but it is the behavior rejected in the New and the Old Testaments, not orientation, which he wants us to accept. Since 1993, approximately 13,500 troops had been discharged for violating DADT policy.

The Pentagon study claims that heterosexuals opposed to repeal of DADT harbored myths about homosexuals. Peer review social science and medical literature confirms there are vast differences between heterosexual and homosexual relationships regarding duration of commitment, number of partners, violence and health risks, verified by homosexual-advocacy literature.

The delusional nature of the Pentagon report's recommendations can be seen from the suggested repeal of Article 125 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, to decriminalize consensual sodomy. Even though the FDA prohibits men who have had sex with men since 1977 from donating blood, the surgeon generals of the military services amazingly concluded there was no additional risk from active homosexuals to American troops under battlefield conditions for blood contact and transfusions despite sodomy being a prime vector for the spread of disease, including AIDS.

The Pentagon study reported 48.9 percent of Army and 59.7 percent of Marine combat troops believed repeal of DADT would negatively affect trust; 47. …

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