Noize from the Editor

By Molenda, Michael | Guitar Player, February 2011 | Go to article overview

Noize from the Editor


Molenda, Michael, Guitar Player


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

THE GP STAFF DID A significant redesign of the magazine for the May 2010 issue. But I'm sure you didn't think we'd stop there, did you?

Since I became Editor of Guitar Player in 1998, I've been lucky enough to have my ass kicked constantly by smart, creative, and impassioned staffers, and an equally zealous and brainy reader community. These two forces ensure that GP always evolves, continually seeks new and exciting ways to spread the gospel of guitar, and seldom takes itself too seriously. Yeah, we sometimes get to hang out with stars and knock around with fob gear, but we never forget that the readers drive this buggy, and that we are basically you. Like you, the editors dig guitars and guitar gear, struggle to improve their technique and tone, play gigs, write songs, record little ditties in their home studios, and so on. We also argue a lot, and the dissention and debates between readers, editors, other guitarists, manufacturers, advertisers, and company executives fuel the very active content and graphic evolutions of the magazine. Gotta love synergy.

The basic premise for this latest rethink was to burn the super-cool excitement of being a guitarist into the very fibers of the magazine. We want you to feel the stage rumbling and the amps humming. We want to better nurture aspiration, as well, and fuel the inner guitar hero in everyone--whether you're playing bedrooms, bars, or arenas. …

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