Communication and the Arts

Manila Bulletin, January 10, 2011 | Go to article overview

Communication and the Arts


MANILA, Philippines - A superior product - but with features poorly communicated to buyers fails in the marketplace. Two vice presidents aiming for the SVP position - all things equal, the better communicator gets the plum title. Communication is everything.We heard Philippine president Manuel L. Quezon was a firebrand speaker like the American president Ronald Reagan who is also often referred to as "The Great Communicator" who made the bad look good and the good, better.In our lifetimes -part of President Ferdinand Marcos appeal was a rich, baritone voice which he used in presenting an image of a manly, robust strongman. President GMA had a grating, somewhat irritating voice which vastly improved towards the second half of her presidency. No doubt, voice experts were used.Even in the midst of a blistering growth in other forms of communication especially in the field of mobile (text) phones and the information highway (Internet), our world is still of the "spoken word." Notice how we speak much more than we do write to others. And good communication equals to good relationships.So strong was our belief in effective oral communication that we have been a member of the Toastmasters Club -an international organization dedicated to the promotion of superb "spoken communication" - for over 20 years.Asked why we joined Toastmasters, we quipped facetiously ,of course, "I joined Toastmasters because we cannot rely on good looks all the time." Laughter, of course.Communication, in fact is made up of (30%)verbal or words and the rest (70%) is non verbal. The non-verbal includes: Voice tone, pauses we make, facial and body language during delivery and of course, the over-all packaging of the personality.Voice tone is very important - notice how telephone operators are trained to greet callers as though they were long lost lovers? Just to stress our point.Notice how the phrase: "Where have you been" can have entirely different meanings based on the tonality of the voice: it can be agitated, missing mood and matter -of-fact questioning.Sing the song "Free Again" -and imagine oneself two ways: happy (at last) at being liberated or at being set free sadly into one's desolate isolation. Tonality makes the difference. Or one cannot greet an acquaintance "Please to meet you" and have a limp grip in one's hand and a sour face to boot.Our Lord Jesus Christ, speaking over seven mountains, must have such a powerful voice; as did Adolf Hitler had when he harangued the German people and Nazi officers into submission.So important is communication that we heard that in the Harvard Medical School, a new definitive subject on "Effective Communications" is required to all medical students.It does not just involve emphasis on the importance of clarity in "laymanizing" medical terms, speaking to hospital and foundation officials but also the training in the use of the proper words, body language and compassionate gestures, say, in announcing an incurable illness or an impending death to patients and their relatives alike. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Communication and the Arts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.