Taking Advantage of Tragedy; Hate Crimes Are Down, but Liberals Use Violence to Target Conservatism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

Taking Advantage of Tragedy; Hate Crimes Are Down, but Liberals Use Violence to Target Conservatism


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

True to Rahm's Rule of never letting a good crisis go to waste, liberal pundits and Democratic politicians are consciously exploiting Saturday's tragic shooting in Tucson for political gain. At a time when the country should be coming together calmly to make sense of something awful, the left has exploded in a shameful display of divisive grandstanding.

The days since the shooting have witnessed a parade of amateur psychologists rendering premature diagnoses on shooter Jared Lee Loughner's motives, focusing their blame on Sarah Palin, Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, the Tea Party movement and a purported rising climate of hate and divisiveness. Yet no facts have emerged lending any credence to this story line. The evidence to date shows Mr. Loughner as a pot-smoking, alcoholic, nihilistic social misfit. His known fringe-type social and political views include atheism, the belief that the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks were an inside job, and a disposition that people generally cannot apprehend reality. No reasonable person could connect these incoherent views with conservative thought, though leftists are trying their hardest.

Liberals contend that conservative voices have contributed to a growing climate of hatred and division in American politics. On Sunday, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, Maryland Democrat, waxed about the good old days when the big three news networks dominated the news cycle, and they saw their job as to inform us of the facts and we would make a conclusion. Of course, this alleged golden age also produced assassins Lee Harvey Oswald, Sirhan Sirhan, James Earl Ray and Squeaky Fromme, among others. MSNBC's Keith Olbermann declaimed rhetoric that has devolved and descended, past the ugly and past the threatening and past the fantastic and into the imminently murderous. Despite such hysteria, this climate of hatred argument has no empirical backing. …

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Taking Advantage of Tragedy; Hate Crimes Are Down, but Liberals Use Violence to Target Conservatism
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