Passion Essential to American Politics; Don't Let Tucson Shooting Sap Our Will to Oppose Liberalism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Passion Essential to American Politics; Don't Let Tucson Shooting Sap Our Will to Oppose Liberalism


Byline: Ted Nugent, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

In the wake of violence perpetrated by a Tucson lunatic, liberals and others who should know better are calling for political rhetoric to be toned down.

It's only those on the left who really want to tone down the political rhetoric - as in conservative rhetoric.

I say conservatives should turn up the rhetoric. When honestly identified, the hues and cries from the right are good for America, calls to get America back on track. Only those opposed to such an upgrade would find fault with such rhetoric.

Regardless of political stripes, all Americans should refuse to allow the actions of a psychotic mad dog to dictate how we conduct ourselves in the political arena, where political debate has always been spirited, hot and sometimes nasty.

Only softheaded, feel-good fantasizers from the cult of denial could believe that toning down the political rhetoric will somehow keep lunatics from doing loony things. Exhibit A: the sheriff of Pima County, Ariz.

Other liberal blowhards, such as Paul Krugman of the New York Times, blame conservative rhetoric for causing the Tucson monster's violence, even though there is less than zero evidence the monster listened to conservative talk radio.

The Tucson monster wasn't inspired by conservative ideology that he heard, read or watched anymore than he was encouraged to commit mayhem by reading Mr. Krugman's column, watching a Michael Moore movie, working out to a Jane Fonda video or humming Harry Belafonte songs.

If liberals truly wanted to tone down the rhetoric, they could prove it by stopping the lying. But that won't happen. Mr. Krugman and other liberals know that if it weren't for a steady drumbeat of lies and deceit, the Democratic Party would cease to exist.

Let's be honest. Those on the left don't want to tone down political rhetoric. They only want to tone down conservative speech to make it more fair.

The Democrats are wrong on everything from energy to health care to taxes. What they despise is having their agenda exposed, dissected and ridiculed. The truth hurts, and they know it, which is why, ultimately, they want to muzzle conservatives.

Never a group of politicos to let a crisis go to waste, liberals like Mr. …

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