From Brooklyn to Abu Dhabi, with 'Love'

By Gopnik, Blake | Newsweek, January 31, 2011 | Go to article overview

From Brooklyn to Abu Dhabi, with 'Love'


Gopnik, Blake, Newsweek


Byline: Blake Gopnik

Brooklyn artists Jennifer and Kevin McCoy come off as the quintessential hipsters: he has 1970s shaggy hair, she wears mod-cool outfits. The McCoys' art, which gets shown around the world, is also very Brooklyn: ultra-low-tech videos and installations about movie culture, childhood fears, even the couple's first date--always packaged with a laugh and a wink.

You have to wonder how that Brooklyn vibe is going over in Abu Dhabi, now that the couple has moved there for a year while Kevin launches the art program at the new Persian Gulf campus of New York University. Judging by their latest works from Abu Dhabi, now on view at Postmasters Gallery in New York, it's clear the McCoys, who are in their early 40s, are having culture shock. Their show, Abu Dhabi Is Love Forever, has a perfect subtitle--One Step Past the Airport--that captures both the state of affairs in this Arabian capitalist mecca and the couple's state of mind. "We wanted to make work out of that moment of arriving in new places," Jennifer says.

Driving downtown from the Abu Dhabi airport for the first time, the McCoys encountered mile after mile of construction, every site wrapped in temporary fences covered with giant photos of the "best" of Western culture. Gleaming high-rises. Bellhops carrying bags for a blonde. A businessman working from home on his laptop. But behind those fences was nothing more than empty desert, or half-finished buildings hammered at by guest workers imported from all sorts of places, none of them depicted in the photos out front.

Those fences, and the emptiness behind them, are the inspiration for the piece at the heart of the Postmasters show. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From Brooklyn to Abu Dhabi, with 'Love'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.