Seeing Stars and Stripes; from a Banjo Session with a Civil War Expert to Gastronomic Gems in Baltimore, a Road Trip around Maryland and Virginia Is Both Entertaining and Illuminating

Daily Mail (London), January 29, 2011 | Go to article overview

Seeing Stars and Stripes; from a Banjo Session with a Civil War Expert to Gastronomic Gems in Baltimore, a Road Trip around Maryland and Virginia Is Both Entertaining and Illuminating


Byline: by Meera Dattani

HE SHOT Lincoln in the head inside this building. That was mission accomplished for John Wilkes Booth.' So ends my Abraham Lincoln assassination tour around Washington DC with historian and former journalist Anthony Pitch.

It's a timely tour. On April 12, it will be 150 years since the start of the American Civil War, which claimed more than 600,000 soldiers' lives, ending slavery and Lincoln. Pitch is the only guide who's made me cry. In two hours of broad daylight, he brings to life Lincoln's last night -- April 14, 1865 -- four days after the war ended. Inside Ford's Theatre is the box where Lincoln was assassinated.

It's an excellent museum housing exhibits such as Wilkes's derringer gun and a full calendar of 2011 anniversary events.

Inside the Lincoln memorial, Abe's statue attracts countless visitors exploring the National Mall, home to DC's free Smithsonian museums, war memorials and the White House. Of course, DC's about more than Lincoln.

The U.S. capital marks the start of a road trip around Maryland and Virginia. The region is an appealing mix of big cities like Washington and Baltimore and beautiful scenery in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains.

With a free audio guide from Cultural Tourism DC's website, I enjoy a bite-sized history lesson on a sign-posted Civil War to civil rights heritage trail before taking the metro to U St/Cardozo.

Here is the Spirit Of Freedom or African-American Soldiers Civil War Memorial and the African-American Civil War Museum, a tribute to the 200,000-plus African-Americans who served in Civil War armies. DC is captivating but Maryland calls. I head north to Antietam battlefield. Some 23,000 soldiers died here on September 17, 1862, the greatest number of losses in a single day in U.S. military history.

Set in the Appalachian foothills, more than 500 cannons dot this 3,200-acre park. It's hard to imagine the bloodshed. The battle ended the Confederate Army's first attempt to invade the North, giving Lincoln enough momentum to issue his Emancipation Proclamation, declaring free slaves in states not under Union control.

Nearby South Mountain and Gathland State Parks offer history and hikes WISDOM Washington planned city, Pierre L'Enfant, military arrived with Lafayette along the 65 kilometre Appalachian Trail.

Quirky towns are Maryland's forte. Frederick, east of Antietam, is no exception with independent restaurants and shops, and an absorbing National Museum Of Civil War Medicine run by the prolific George Wunderlich - Civil War buff, volunteer fireman, ballistics expert and banjo specialist. After an impromptu banjo lesson, I leave for Baltimore.

Baltimore boasts gastro-paradise Lexington Market, the Orioles baseball ground, waterfront Fells Point and skyline views from Federal Hill Park. The brilliant B&O Railroad Museum also hits the spot. Housing the U.S.'s most extensive collection of railroad trains, it shows how Baltimore as a transport hub was key to Union victory. It's then time to travel south to former Confederate territory.

Where's Scarlett, Ashley and co? They're Gone With The Wind I presume. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Seeing Stars and Stripes; from a Banjo Session with a Civil War Expert to Gastronomic Gems in Baltimore, a Road Trip around Maryland and Virginia Is Both Entertaining and Illuminating
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.