Eliminating Sugary Drinks Good in More Ways Than One

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 31, 2011 | Go to article overview

Eliminating Sugary Drinks Good in More Ways Than One


An unlucky 16-year-old was experiencing urinary discomfort and testicular pain and was referred to a urologist for a full evaluation. The specialist examined the young man, ran a few tests and concluded that the boy was suffering from inflammation of the prostate gland.

The teen was told to keep well-hydrated by drinking plenty of water. He was also advised to avoid sources of bladder irritation through elimination of sugary, carbonated and caffeinated drinks from his diet.

Water is inexpensive and readily available, and drinking water can help alleviate some of the annoying symptoms caused by common afflictions such as headaches and constipation.

The Institutes of Medicine explains that water is essential for life since it helps maintain homeostasis -- the body's metabolic balance -- and allows for cellular transport of nutrients and removal of waste products.

Healthy individuals generally don't have to put a lot of effort into staying hydrated since hunger drives our consumption of food, which contains sufficient moisture to provide about 20 percent of our total water intake.

Normal thirst mechanisms do the rest, urging us to drink enough between and during mealtimes to supply us with the other 80 percent of fluids needed to keep us hydrated.

There is no true Recommended Dietary Allowance for water intake due to lack of individual data.

Though water intoxication can occur in extreme cases, maximum levels of water intake have also not been established since healthy adult kidneys can process an impressive amount of fluid each hour. …

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Eliminating Sugary Drinks Good in More Ways Than One
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