South's Vote to Secede Adds to Pressures in North Sudan

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 8, 2011 | Go to article overview

South's Vote to Secede Adds to Pressures in North Sudan


Byline: Ashish Kumar Sen, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A decision by an overwhelming majority of southerners to secede from Sudan likely will put new pressure on President Omar Bashir's fragile regime in a region rocked by anti-government protests.

The Obama administration, worried about the stability of the regime, is closely monitoring Khartoum's reaction to the outcome of the secession vote, anti-government protests and fighting in the western province of Darfur.

A senior U.S. official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the matter, said the Obama administration has been very candid with Lt. Gen. Bashir's government about the need to act with restraint.

U.S. and southern Sudanese officials are worried that a collapse of Gen. Bashir's government could imperil the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA). Gen. Bashir's ruling National Congress Party (NCP) signed the agreement with the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM). It ended two decades of civil war in which 2 million people were killed.

Right now we all are concerned that if there is a party to [the CPA] that loses its way, it could imperil the peace agreement that we are trying to implement and could imperil the last elements of this agreement, which are really the most critical, said the senior U.S. official.

Gen. Bashir on Monday said he would respect the decision of the southerners, who are mostly black Christians or animists, to secede from the north, dominated by Arab Muslims.

An official tally of the vote was announced at an emotionally charged ceremony in Khartoum on Monday. It showed that 98.83 percent of southerners favored secession. Out of more 3.8 million valid ballots cast, fewer than 45,000, or 1.17 percent, favored unity with the north.

The senior U.S. official said Gen. Bashir's recognition of the results was a sign that the NCP had realized that the downside risks of contesting this were so great that it was likely not worth the costs to the regime.

Critics in Sudan have accused Gen. Bashir of losing the oil-rich south. The political upheaval sweeping across the Arab world, including in Sudan's northern neighbor Egypt, has underscored the fragile state of his government.

Events in the region highlight what we have known to be true for a long time, which is that the NCP is in a very precarious position domestically, the senior U. …

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