Where Love Is in the Air; on Valentine's Daywe Bring You a Guide to Merseyside's Most Romantic Places

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), February 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Where Love Is in the Air; on Valentine's Daywe Bring You a Guide to Merseyside's Most Romantic Places


Eros Statue, Sefton Park FOR decades, lovers have met under the Shaftsbury memorial, as it is correctly known.

The six foot tall Eros statue is the upper part of the fountain, and was copied from the memorial to Anthony Ashley-Cooper, Earl of Shaftesbury.

Sculptor Alfred Gilbert worked on the memorial in the late 19th century and the finished work was unveiled in Piccadilly Circus in 1893. The model for the figure of Eros was one of Gilbert''s studio assistants called Angelo Colorossi.

At first the fountain did not receive a warm reception. Critics felt that a fountain sculpture of Eros was not a suitable memorial to the late Earl of Shaftsbury. Eros is the Greek god of carnal love. Despite this criticism it soon became one of London's most famous landmarks.

George Audley of Liverpool liked the fountain so much that he commissioned a copy from the sculptor Alfred Gilbert in the 1920s. The setting of the sculpture was Sefton Park, where Audley had earlier commissioned a second cast of a sculpture of Peter Pan by George Frampton.The Eros fountain was made in 1929 and unveiled in Sefton Park in 1932. Sadly Audley died a few months before the unveiling.

Liverpool city council owns the original sculpture of Eros, although it was removed from Sefton Park in 1991 due to public health and safety concerns, and substituted by an exact replica. It is currently held for safekeeping at the National Conservation Centre.

Otterspool Prom FOR generations of Liverpudlians Otterspool has proved a popular day out, and following pounds 1.75m refurbishment works, ''the Prom'' is one of Liverpool''s most special open spaces and a great contrast with the city''s more traditional park legacy.

"Egg sarnies and Lambrini (or Ribena if you are driving) watching the sun set over Wales from Otterspool Prom has to be one of the most romantic views," says Brian "Nasher" Nash, the guitarist from Frankie Goes to Hollywood. "The beauty of an Otterspool sunset means the sandwich filling is irrelevant, even beef paste would do.

"When I was a kid my mam and dad never drove so my journeys around Liverpool were usually along the main bus routes. I am ashamed to say that it wasn''t until my daughter Lois came to Liverpool University and was in the nearby halls of residence that I saw the sign leading down to Otterspool Promenade and thought I would check it out.

"I knew of its existence and Pete Wylie had told me it was one of the reasons he lived in that part of town. I have been several times since, almost every visit if I can, and it is always a different scene.

"The day after the Bunnymen gig just before Christmas I took two Londoners down there. The Mersey was like glass and the only sound was fishing lines dropping in the water and the occasional barking dog. It is now part of my 'tourist' stops when I bring visitors to our fine city along with the Anglican Cathedral and Strawberry Field. I haven''t persuaded my missus to go there yet though. Maybe the Lambrini would swing it, what d''ya reckon?" Panoramic LOVE is in the air - 100m in the air to be exact - at Liverpool's highest restaurant, which has become a favourite spot for men looking to propose to their girlfriends.

Panoramic had six marriage proposals on one night last year, and that wasn't even Valentine's Day.

Restaurant manager Andy Patrick says: "We're used to people proposing in the restaurant - we usually have at least a couple a week. But we were amazed when six people chose to do it.

"People thinking of proposing usually mention it when they're booking in to the restaurant, as they will often ask for a quiet table. Once we see a couple grinning and talking on their mobile phones, we usually take that as a good sign and send a glass of champagne over. On that night the corks never stopped popping."

It isn't the first time that Panoramic has played host to romantic gestures. …

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