Shore Blimey; NIGEL THOMPSON Is Wowed by Norway and Gorgeous Its Coastline

The Mirror (London, England), February 19, 2011 | Go to article overview

Shore Blimey; NIGEL THOMPSON Is Wowed by Norway and Gorgeous Its Coastline


Byline: NIGEL THOMPSON

WHEN Mother Nature was handing out coastlines*, Norway must have been first in the queue. And probably second and third too.

There's not just a remarkable 52,000 miles of it, including the thousands of islands, it's also stupendously beautiful.

I'd flown to the very likeable Bergen with Scandinavian Airlines for a short city break in late September - but with some meteorological trepidation.

Bergen, it must be said, has a reputation for being a bit rainy. Extremely rainy, to be honest.

But Mother Nature was in a particularly benevolent mood for 48 hours and the early autumn sun shone from a cloudless sky with the glorious kind of light that you only really get in the northern latitudes. I joined the White Lady at the quayside by Bergen's daily fish market on a very brisk but delightful morning for a half-day trip up the Osterfjord.

The city, Norway's second largest, sprawls pleasantly around the superb natural harbour, and it took a good 20 minutes for the White Lady to clear the more urban area. It gave the passengers just enough time for a much-needed cup of hot coffee. Just the ticket.

Once into the fjord proper, the rush for the best viewing spot on the open decks began in earnest.

We glided across the calm, inky black waters, merrily snapping our cameras at the jolly little fishing villages which we saw dotted along the beautiful fjord shore.

There were cormorants by the dozen, stretching out their black wings on rocks to catch the gently warming rays of the sun, and perched like a sentinel on a post in the water was a majestic sea eagle.

As the White Lady reached the halfway point, we passed sheer cliffs rising from the water, and what little warmth there was from the sun was quickly lost in their dark shadows.

With the camaraderie you get on tourist transportation, everybody was soon swapping cameras to take pictures of each other posing in front of the glorious scenery.

All too soon the White Lady was heading back to Bergen, but there was a fine view of the harbour and the surrounding hills as we headed in.

Since it was a morning start, half-day tour (cost around pounds 45), there was still plenty of time - and daylight at the latitude - for some more sightseeing.

After a look round the modest fish market with its huge crabs and dustbin-lid sized slabs of smoked salmon, I headed to the Bryggen area, in the northern section of the harbour .

This is one of the oldest parts of Bergen, and features an area of wooden buildings built in the early 18th century on the fire-ravaged site of the city's medieval Hanseatic League trading district.

It has craft shops, cafes and restaurants and is a charming spot for a wander, fully justifying its prized UNESCO World Heritage status.

Fortified by another coffee, I headed for the Floibanen Funicular railway for a bird's eye view of Bergen.

This train whizzes up Floyen Hill, dropping you off at a viewpoint with a cafe and souvenir shop more than 1,000ft above the city.

It's a tourist and locals' favourite - and it's easy to understand why. Expect queues when you get there, but they do move quite quickly .

The vista of Bergen and its surroundings was wonderful - down in the harbour sat the vast white shape of the Grand Princess cruise ship and beyond, the sunlit waters leading eventually to the chilly Norwegian Sea. A return fare is pounds 7.

Bergen has a wide range of museums, covering art, science, local history, natural history, the sea and so on. But possibly the most curious is the Leprosy Museum, built on the site of a preserved lepers' hospital from the 18th century. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Shore Blimey; NIGEL THOMPSON Is Wowed by Norway and Gorgeous Its Coastline
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.