How a King's Speech Laid Bare His Fear and Fatigue

Daily Mail (London), February 19, 2011 | Go to article overview

How a King's Speech Laid Bare His Fear and Fatigue


Byline: Jim McBeth

IT was the king's speech falteringly delivered by a monarch burdened by fear and the weight of history.

But unlike his successor George VI, there was no kindly therapist to help Charles II speak with dignity to his people as he nervously read out his apology to Scots noblemen in a bid to save his kingdom.

Three centuries earlier, Charles' speech had been one of abject capitulation to religious zealots who had demanded a high price in exchange for returning his crown.

Now the speech, written and then delivered by the king in Perth in 1650, is going under the hammer.

The king's plea, written in his own hand down the side of one page and folded to make it easier to deliver, was a grovelling apology to the Scottish parliament for trying to escape its control. The king's handwriting shows signs of exhaustion and fear in a 20-yearold man who knew that without the 'Covenanters' his kingdom was lost.

The parliament had declared Charles the King of Great Britain after the execution of his father Charles I in 1649.

In June 1650 he arrived in Scotland, a land dominated by Protestants determined to spread Presbyterianism throughout Britain.

Charles was forced to accept this as a condition of support against Oliver Cromwell.

But in September 1650, Cromwell's New Model Army routed the Covenanters at the Battle of Dunbar, near Edinburgh.

Charles and the defeated host retreated to Perth, where he soon wearied of the incessant demands of the Covenanters. He was required to denounce his parents and renounce a treaty he had made with Ireland. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How a King's Speech Laid Bare His Fear and Fatigue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.