Dickens, Modernism, Modernity: Chateau De Cerisy-la-Salle (Normandy, France): 25 August-1 September 2011

Dickens Quarterly, March 2011 | Go to article overview

Dickens, Modernism, Modernity: Chateau De Cerisy-la-Salle (Normandy, France): 25 August-1 September 2011


The conference theme is designed to examine the reasons why the fiction of Charles Dickens, this "flowing and mixed substance called Dickens," to speak like Chesterton, became straightaway--and forever, it would seem--a world landmark. We shall ask why the fictional techniques and procedures which delighted Dickens's contemporaries still inspire today's writers, after striking their twentieth-century predecessors' imagination wonderfully.

The bicentenary of "The Inimitable"'s birth will be celebrated worldwide next year; yet some of the secret springs of his timeless, mythical fiction still remain to be uncovered. As we know, modernity foregrounds the power of words and the text's capacity to create an autonomous world--and in this respect, the Dickens corpus illustrates supremely the creative magic of language. Such an observation, however, fails to account fully for the perennial appeal of his fiction. It is the aim of this international conference, which will gather many world specialists, to address precisely this issue, notably by examining some lesser known aspects of the great novelist's work in the light of the modernist stance.

Keynote addresses

"Charles Dickens Citoyen" (Michael Hollington) "International Dickens: Reappraising Little Dorrit" (Robert Patten)

Speakers

Andrew Ballantyne; Matthias Bauer; Murray Baumgarten; John Bowen; Stephen Casmier; Zelma Catalan; Adina Ciugureanu; David Ellison; Lawrence Frank; Holly Furneaux; Michal Ginsburg; Simona Girleanu; Jonathan Grossman; Juliet John; John Jordan; Valerie Kennedy; Natalie McKnight; Goldie Morgentaler; Francesca Orestano; David Parker; Wendy Parkins; David Paroissien; Gillian Piggott; Dominic Rainsford; Ignacio Ramos Gay; Elinor Shaffer; Paul Schlicke; Vladimir Trendafilov; Angelika Zirker. …

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