Why Matchday Suits Could Boost a Teams' Chances; According to Latest Psychological Research - the Outfit a Manager Chooses to Wear When He's Standing in the Dugout Can Have a Major Impact on the Performance of His Team, Reports Aled Blake

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 22, 2011 | Go to article overview

Why Matchday Suits Could Boost a Teams' Chances; According to Latest Psychological Research - the Outfit a Manager Chooses to Wear When He's Standing in the Dugout Can Have a Major Impact on the Performance of His Team, Reports Aled Blake


Byline: Aled Blake

IF our two Championship football sides gain promotion this season, the reason may have as much to do with the sartorial dress sense of the two managers than simply having the better players. s s

With Craig Bellamy, Aaron Ramsey and Jay Bothroyd spearheading Cardiff City's charge to top flight football and Darren Pratley, Scott Sinclair and Ashley Williams leading Swansea City's promotion assault, the outlook for Wales' top two clubs has rarely been so rosy.

But scientists believe the success of the Swans and the Bluebirds could be down to more than just quality football and tactical nous.

Because the managers of both teams - Dave Jones at Cardiff and Brendan Rodgers at Swansea - don their finest two-piece when their sides take to the pitch each week.

It means that with the two clubs battling to win promotion to the Premier League and the millions of pounds that would be their reward, their prospects in achieving that goal are all the more healthy because of the two managers' matchday dress sense.

Sports scientists at the University of Portsmouth studied the effect a coach's appearance had on the players' impressions of their competence.

They found that sports coaches who wear suits on match days and tracksuits on training days are more likely to get the best out of their teams.

It may be one reason why the matchday tracksuitwearing former Wales manager John Toshack did not have the kind of success in charge of the country that many predicted he would.

Dr Richard Thelwell said: "We have found that the clothing that coaches wear can have a direct effect on the players' perceptions of the coach's ability.

"Players look to their coach to provide technical skills, to motivate them and to lead them.

"A coach in a suit suggests strategic prowess which is obviously ideal for a match.

"In our study, coaches wearing a suit were perceived as being more strategically competent than those wearing sporting attire.

"However, when wearing sporting attire, they were perceived to be more technically competent than those in a suit."

For the research, published in the International Journal of Sport Psychology, the researchers asked 97 men and women to observe and give their reactions to static photographs of four different coaches.

The pictures depicted coaches who were of lean physique and dressed in a tracksuit, large physique and dressed in a tracksuit, lean physique and dressed in a suit and large physique and dressed in a suit.

The coach who was of large build and wearing smart clothes was uniformly ranked the lowest in terms of their competence to motivate, develop technique, develop game strategy, and build athlete character.

The coach who was lean and wearing a tracksuit was rated best for technical and character-building abilities which were skills most required at training and development of players and was rated equal best for "ability to motivate players". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Why Matchday Suits Could Boost a Teams' Chances; According to Latest Psychological Research - the Outfit a Manager Chooses to Wear When He's Standing in the Dugout Can Have a Major Impact on the Performance of His Team, Reports Aled Blake
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.