Presidential or Parliamentary?

Manila Bulletin, February 25, 2011 | Go to article overview

Presidential or Parliamentary?


MANILA, Philippines - The recent Senate hearing chaired by Senator Miriam Santiago has again revived the controversial issue on Charter change. This, and calls for constitutional reforms in several Middle East countries (Egypt, Bahrain, Libya, etc.) undergoing civil unrest, are valid arguments for bringing it up for public debate. Six eminent constitutionalists - former CJ Reynato Puno, former Associate Justice Vicente Mendoza, former UP President Jose Abueva, former AJ Adolf Azcuna, former Law Dean Merlin Magallona, and former AJ Florentino Feliciano who were invited to the hearings, presented their views on either a parliamentary-federal or presidential structure. The first three favor a shift, the other two are neutral, and the last, against, if not cautionary about any change. Columnist Winnie Monsod, citing studies by experts, suggests further analysis of studies on the parliamentary structure, and especially of its potential impact with regard to corruption, democratic survivability, government spending, ability to implement structural reforms, and economic performance. Since there is not much significant correlation between the structure of government and these variables, Monsod asks whether there indeed is a compelling need to change to a parliamentary system.

Let me review some of those comparisons that have been brought up in early debates. One states that parliamentary democracies tend to last longer than presidential democracies. The difference in their survival rates is not, however, due to the country's wealth, economic performance, or conditions under which they emerged. The instability of presidential democracies is explained by the separation between the executive and legislative - deadlocks, lack of a constitutional principle that can be invoked to resolve conflicts (vote of no confidence) present in parliamentary regimes. Extra-constitutional means are resorted to, causing instability (Jose Antonio Cheibub, 2001).

Another study testing the relationship between a measure of parliamentary rule and 14 indicators in 3 policy areas - political development, economic development, and human development, show a strong relationship between parliamentarianism and good governance. (John Gerring et al, 2008) According to Tsebelis, (2000), the only difference is that because of greater institutional fragmentation, presidentialism offers greater resistance to change. Parliamentary systems foster stronger political parties, have more institutionalized, centralized decision-making and hierarchical administrative structures, and are more decisive, while presidential systems foster a more personalized and free-floating style of leadership centered on individual politicians. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Presidential or Parliamentary?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.