Do We Still Need Unions? No

By McKinnon, Mark | Newsweek, March 7, 2011 | Go to article overview

Do We Still Need Unions? No


McKinnon, Mark, Newsweek


Byline: Mark McKinnon

Let's End a Privileged Class.

The manufactured Madison, Wis., mob is not the movement the White House was hoping for. Both may find themselves at the wrong end of the populist pitchfork. While I generally defend collective bargaining and private-sector unions (lots of airline pilots in my family), it is the abuse by public unions and their bosses that pushes centrists like me to the GOP. It is the right and duty of citizens to petition their government. The Tea Party and Republicans seek to limit government growth to protect their pocketbooks. Public-union bosses want to increase the cost of government to protect their racket.

1. Public unions are big money. Public unions are big money. Paul Krugman is correct: we do need "some counterweight to the political power of big money." But in the Alice in Wonderland world where what's up is down and what's down is up, Krugman believes public unions do not represent big money. Of the top 20 biggest givers in federal-level politics over the past 20 years, 10 are unions; just four are corporations. The three biggest public unions gave $171.5 million for the 2010 elections alone, according to The Wall Street Journal. That's big money.

2. Public unions redistribute wealth. Public employees contribute real value for the benefit of all citizens. Public-union bosses collect real money from all taxpayers for the benefit of a few. Unlike private-sector jobs, which are more than fully funded through revenues created in a voluntary exchange of money for goods or serv-ices, public-sector jobs are funded by taxpayer dollars, forcibly collected by the government (union dues are often deducted from public employees' paychecks). In 28 states, state and local employees must pay full union dues or be fired. A sizable portion of those dues is then donated by the public unions almost exclusively to Democratic candidates. Michael Barone sums it up: "public-employee unions are a mechanism by which every taxpayer is forced to fund the Democratic Party. …

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