CRAFTED IN TOUGH TIMES; after Five Years in the Making, the Cardiff Story Museum Will Finally Open Its Doors to the Public on April 1. in the First of a Five-Part Series, CLARE HUTCHINSON Meets Some of the Echo Readers Who Helped Bring to Life the First Museum Dedicated to Cardiff's History

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), March 4, 2011 | Go to article overview

CRAFTED IN TOUGH TIMES; after Five Years in the Making, the Cardiff Story Museum Will Finally Open Its Doors to the Public on April 1. in the First of a Five-Part Series, CLARE HUTCHINSON Meets Some of the Echo Readers Who Helped Bring to Life the First Museum Dedicated to Cardiff's History


Byline: CLARE HUTCHINSON

WHEN Magi Roberts read in the Echo that a new Cardiff museum was looking for objects and stories from local people, her thoughts turned to one particular item wrapped in tissue paper in a drawer in her house.

The item was a quilted cushion cover, made by a woman working in a village co-operative more than 70 years ago.

Despite its everyday appearance, this object tells a remarkable story about entrepreneurship and resilience during one of the UK's worst depressions. This is why the cushion cover - and dozens more treasures like it - will take pride of place in the new Cardiff Story museum in the Old Library building on The Hayes when it opens next month.

Now on display in the museum's Object Theatre, the cushion cover is accompanied by a video of Magi, 68, who works as a guide on the city's open-top bus and her husband Emrys, 79, a retired health manager, of Canton, who tell its incredible story. Museum officer Victoria Rogers said: "Every object, no matter what it looks like and no matter how everyday it is, can tell a great story and the cushion cover is no exception.

"If you scratch the surface you find a fantastic story about one woman's determination to help her community during a really tough time in Cardiff's history."

Magi and Emrys found the cushion cover among the possessions of Emrys' aunt, Elisabeth Williams, after she died.

Elisabeth, who was known as "Modryb Bet" (Auntie Bet), was born in Blaenau Ffestiniog but moved to Gwaelod-y-Garth when she married her husband Griffith John Williams, a university lecturer, in the early 1930s.

It was a time of economic downturn that became known as the Great Slump, and was the largest and most profound economic depression of the 20th Century.

Magi said: "Modryb Bet lived in a fairly large house, called Bryn Taf, and during the depression she saw the poverty around her and wanted to do something to help the village.

"I can remember her telling me that in those days you couldn't really interfere in men's matters and so she was trying to think of a way in which she could help these families. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CRAFTED IN TOUGH TIMES; after Five Years in the Making, the Cardiff Story Museum Will Finally Open Its Doors to the Public on April 1. in the First of a Five-Part Series, CLARE HUTCHINSON Meets Some of the Echo Readers Who Helped Bring to Life the First Museum Dedicated to Cardiff's History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.