Cooking Up a Whole New Form of Art

By Gopnik, Blake | Newsweek, March 14, 2011 | Go to article overview

Cooking Up a Whole New Form of Art


Gopnik, Blake, Newsweek


Byline: Blake Gopnik

What if Rembrandt made soup? Rirkrit Tiravanija challenges audiences by serving them dinner.

Michelangelo worked in fresco and marble. Rembrandt preferred oils and etchings. Rirkrit Tiravanija--who just might be in their league--has his own trademark art supplies: curry paste and lime and, more important, the audience that eats his food.

His latest show just opened in New York, and one of its major works is a $1 bowl of soup served by the artist to anyone who wanders in. His art isn't in the soup itself but in the social interactions it triggers. It's about "ourselves in each other's company, eating," says the exhibition statement. It expands "our ideas of sculpture to include even our digestive tract."

No, it's not April 1 yet. Rirkrit really is a celebrated figure, winner of all the big prizes in this country and major shows from Paris to Bangkok. (Rirkrit--who is 49 and goes by his first name--is from Thailand and lives there as well as in New York and Berlin.) "I think he's made us rethink everything about art and about experiencing art," says Rochelle Steiner, dean of the art school at the University of Southern California.

Ten days before the opening, Rirkrit is in the gallery, Gavin Brown's Enterprise, contemplating his plans for it. He says his work is about "resisting expectation and being open to the everyday--which is about the unexpected." He's turning the building's private kitchen into a public soup station. And he's designed a plywood structure, set inside the gallery's soaring spaces, that will be a facsimile of the smaller quarters where dealer Gavin Brown began. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cooking Up a Whole New Form of Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.