Consider Language, Culture in Teaching

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

Consider Language, Culture in Teaching


Consider language, culture in teaching

According to a New York Times article, more than 5 million children in the United States enter school each year speaking a language other than English. That amount is expected to grow to 25 percent by the year 2025.

U-46, the second largest school district in Illinois, reflects this diversity in its demographics: White: 36.5 percent, African-American: 6.9 percent, Hispanic: 44.4 percent, Asian: 8.1 percent, Native American: 0.2 percent.

In addition to this ethnic variety, there are other factors that have an impact on the performance of each learner in the classroom, such as learning preferences, communication style and culture.

Multicultural education acknowledges the differences that children bring to school, assuming the possibility that students' identities may influence how they experience school and learn.

Accepting these differences also means making provisions for them. The Daily Herald recently reported that U-46 serves about 8,600 bilingual students across all grades. For bilingual education to be effective it is essential not only that these students receive instruction in their native language, but also to bring their background knowledge into the equation.

Karla Matus

Elgin

Listen to both sides of gun debate

I'm a retired suburban police sergeant who, through most of my career, wished I could jettison the added weight of my sidearm. That being said, I relied upon it for my well-being and the well-being of others who might be in a life-taking situation.

Anti-gun advocates claim they want a safer society, yet an armed, law-abiding citizen is not as dangerous as a licensed driver. There are instruments of death and destruction by function and design that cause far more carnage than the item that is protected by our constitution. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Consider Language, Culture in Teaching
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.