The Living Fossil: This Fish "Walked" the Waters of the Indian Ocean Undetected by Scientists for Thousands of Years

By Burridge, Mary | ROM Magazine, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

The Living Fossil: This Fish "Walked" the Waters of the Indian Ocean Undetected by Scientists for Thousands of Years


Burridge, Mary, ROM Magazine


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Against all odds, a fish thought to be extinct for 65 million years was hauled up from the depths of the Indian Ocean in 1938 off the east coast of South Africa. Evidence of the coelacanth disappeared from the fossil record during the last great extinction when more than 50 percent of the world's animal species, including the dinosaurs, were wiped out. Finding a living coelacanth--considered one of the great scientific discoveries of the 20th century--was as miraculous as coming across a dinosaur walking through the Alberta badlands.

Not surprisingly, its known as a "living fossil." Its other nickname, "old four legs," refers to the coelacanth's paired, lobed fins that move in an alternating gait similar to a human swinging its arms while walking-- distinctly unlike the swimming motion of other fishes. This trait is one of a unique set of features that led ichthyologists to class the coelacanth lineage as the most closely related to early four-legged land animals called tetrapods--a kind of missing link between water and land dwellers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Living Fossil: This Fish "Walked" the Waters of the Indian Ocean Undetected by Scientists for Thousands of Years
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.