"Mniszek's Sonnet": In Honor of J. Thomas Shaw, Pushkinist Extraordinaire

Pushkin Review, Annual 2007 | Go to article overview

"Mniszek's Sonnet": In Honor of J. Thomas Shaw, Pushkinist Extraordinaire


In recognition of Professor Shaw's lifetime work and numerous contributions to the field of Pushkin studies in North America, we are including two special sections to the journal for this issue.

Part 1: (1) Contest for the best rhymed translation of "Mniszek's Sonnet" in Boris Godunov.

Following Professor Shaw's studies of the rhymes in Pushkin's play, we invited literary, rhymed translations of the final fifteen lines of scene 12 in Boris Godunov. Professor Shaw has discussed the function of the sonnet in the context of sonnets in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Act I, scene 5. For more information, see Professor Shaw's article, "Romeo and Juliet, Local Color, and 'Mniszek's Sonnet' in Boris Godunov" (Slavic and East European Journal 35:1 [Spring 1991]: 1-35), or his book, Pushkin's Poetics of the Unexpected (Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1993).

Many thanks to our judges, James Falen and J. Douglas Clayton.

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

SONNET WINNER: Antony Wood, London (UK)

      MNISZEK:

   Old men like us no longer join the dance;
   The sound of the mazurka has no thrill
   For us who do not squeeze or kiss soft hands ...
   Ah, memories of those times are with me still!
   Now things are different, youth is not so bold,
   Nor beauty so light-hearted as we knew it--I
   fear we must acknowledge that the world
   Is now a duller place; we'll leave them to it.
   I would propose we don't stay here, my friend,
   One moment more; we'll see if we can find
   Some old Hungarian vintage, moss-encrusted,
   And in a corner, just the two of us,
   We'll pour the rich, fat, fragrant stream and taste it,
   And there'll be many things we shall discuss.
   Dear comrade, come.

      WISNIOWIECKI:
        Yes, just the two of us.

RUNNERS UP:

Alyssa Dinega Gillespie, University of Notre Dame

      MNISZEK:

   We ancient chaps no longer join the dancing,
   The music's cadence leaves us strangely cold,
   Nor pet and kiss each hand that charms our fancy--
   Oh no, I've not forgot our pranks of old! … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

"Mniszek's Sonnet": In Honor of J. Thomas Shaw, Pushkinist Extraordinaire
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.