Interview: Francis Fukuyama

By Bast, Andrew | Newsweek, April 4, 2011 | Go to article overview

Interview: Francis Fukuyama


Bast, Andrew, Newsweek


Byline: Andrew Bast

He wrote The End of History. Now the Japanese-American historian ponders the tsunami's wake.

What's Tokyo to do?

Beyond the obvious, they need to get their act together. Japanese citizens are frustrated about getting essential information like, for one, radiation levels.

Japan's government has been paralyzed by infighting for years.

This could be an occasion for major renewal. I hope that happens, because, like us, Japan faces similar problems--a dire fiscal situation, aging population. Only theirs are far more severe.

Will the Fukushima catastrophe squelch the global nuclear renaissance?

It already has. But it's too bad because it's just as dangerous to, say, be addicted to oil in the Middle East and every 10 years or so have to go to war for it.

Your mother was born in Kyoto. Both you and your father were born in the States. What kind of connection do you feel to Japan?

I don't speak Japanese. In many ways the country feels like a foreign place.

Is it true that members of your family were held in internment camps during World War II? …

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