Turkey's Press Freedom Attack Is a Disgrace; Britain and Europe Should Heap Shame on Turkey for Treatment of Journalists, Just as It Bids to Join EU MEDIA ANALYSIS

The Evening Standard (London, England), April 6, 2011 | Go to article overview

Turkey's Press Freedom Attack Is a Disgrace; Britain and Europe Should Heap Shame on Turkey for Treatment of Journalists, Just as It Bids to Join EU MEDIA ANALYSIS


Byline: Roy Greenslade

THOSE journalists working in the liberal democracies of the West generally enjoy the luxury of going about their business without the threat of prosecution or prison.

There are odd exceptions, such as the occasional jail terms handed out in the United States to those who refuse to reveal their confidential sources and those in Britain who dare to hack into mobile phone messages.

Elsewhere around the world, in countries where there is no respect for freedom of any kind, let alone press freedom, the situation is very different. One conservative estimate of the number of journalists in jail across the world at the end of 2010, compiled by the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists, put the total at 145. I say conservative because it did not mention Belarus where, in December alone, it was reported that 25 journalists had been taken into custody. Though some were released, several remain in prison.

Other press freedom watchdogs -- such as the Paris-based Reporters Sans Frontieres and the Vienna-based International Press Institute -- have reported many individual cases which suggest that the number of journalists in jail is at an all-time high.

Some of the countries with the worst records are unsurprising. In China, for example, journalism is undoubtedly thriving -- despite print and internet censorship -- but it nevertheless remains a dangerous activity. There were 34 in prison up to February, when the wave of uprisings in the Arab countries began. Since then, there has been a round-up of reporters, bloggers and assorted online writers.

In Iran, the CPJ believes the regime holds 34 journalists. Burma has incarcerated 13 and Uzbekistan holds six. There are also handfuls in the jails of Cuba, Ethiopia and Sudan.

We might regard these countries with totalitarian governments as "the usual suspects" because they do not subscribe to any notion of human rights. The same cannot be said, however, for the country that emerged this week as the globe's leading jailer of journalists: Turkey.

According to a detailed and comprehensive report by the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Turkish prisons at present are holding 57 journalists.

Again, this is a conservative figure. At an Istanbul protest rally staged last month by concerned Turkish journalists it was claimed that 68 were in detention. There was a similar demonstration a week later in Ankara. Turkey, you will immediately note, is anxious to become part of the European Union. To that end, its prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, talks continually of his country's commitment to human rights.

But there is precious little sign of that in practice. It does not help his case to point out that, in December, he visited Libya to hold talks with Colonel Muammar Gaddafi and became the delighted recipient of "the prestigious" Al-Gaddafi International Prize for Human Rights. Yes, you read that correctly. On receiving the award, Erdogan said: "The only thing we want in our region and in the globe is peace and justice."

The jailing of so many journalists in Turkey raises questions about how genuine Erdogan's claims and his country's stated desire to promote a democratic image actually are.

It cuts no ice with the IPI -- a global network of editors, media executives and leading journalists -- which illustrated its deep scepticism about the nature of the charges against one particular journalist, Nedim Sener, by naming him last year as a World Press Freedom Hero. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Turkey's Press Freedom Attack Is a Disgrace; Britain and Europe Should Heap Shame on Turkey for Treatment of Journalists, Just as It Bids to Join EU MEDIA ANALYSIS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.