Patient Struggles with MCS Issues

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

Patient Struggles with MCS Issues


Q.Multiple chemical sensitivity is a crippling problem for those who suffer from it. I would like to educate people about the problem because most people think that Im crazy or that "just getting fresh air" will resolve the problem. The effects of chemicals used in personal and laundry products act as neurotoxins on my system, resulting in neurological difficulties diminished cognitive function, loss of equilibrium, fogging vision, etc. Local drugstores and laundry-detergent aisles are lethal vats of poison for MCS sufferers. I am a massage therapist and have asked clients to refrain from wearing fragrance, but I have found their use of fragrant laundry products more dangerous than cologne. In particular, dryer sheets are extremely poisonous and cannot be purged from the room just by airing it out. I urge people to investigate the toxicity of their laundry products.

I react violently to these products, but I have to feel that the poisons are affecting people in ways they may not know. Clothes are in constant contact with peoples skin, which absorbs chemicals into the body. Many people complain of chronic sinus problems and headaches. Perhaps it is the environment they are creating for themselves. Clothes dryers venting the fumes outdoors pollute the air for everyone. I am becoming a hermit and a "crazy old lady" because of MCS. I know the world cant change because of my affliction, but maybe if people would investigate the problem of "fragrance" in their products, they might begin to search for alternatives for their own health. Ever wonder what all of those wonderful air fresheners that puff at you as you walk by are doing to your health? …

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