Caveman's Delight: Herzog's Enigmatic Musings Have an Emotional Effect on Ryan Gilbey

By Gilbey, Ryan | New Statesman (1996), March 28, 2011 | Go to article overview

Caveman's Delight: Herzog's Enigmatic Musings Have an Emotional Effect on Ryan Gilbey


Gilbey, Ryan, New Statesman (1996)


Cave of Forgotten Dreams (U)

dir Werner Herzog

If there is one thing we know about Werner Herzog, it is that he's not a man to shrink from a challenge. He traversed the Sahara in Fata Morgana, penetrated the depths of the Peruvian rainforest in Aguirre, Wrath of God, and proved in Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call--New Orleans that Nicolas Cage still has a few thespian bones in his body: is there nothing that fazes him? In Cave of Forgotten Dreams, he ventures into territory that has proved hazardous for many film-makers before him--3-D. There is an obvious irony in employing this jazzy format in a documentary about prehistoric cave paintings. But while it does heighten contour and texture, 3-D cannot take credit for the film's successes, any more than it can be blamed for its flaws.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Herzog travelled to the Antarctic for his previous documentary, Encounters at the End of the World. The new picture takes him to a location that has accommodated even fewer human visitors, at least in the past 10,000 years. The signs are that, even before then, the Chauvet-Pont-d'Arc Cave (named after Jean-Marie Chauvet, one of the speleologists who discovered it in the south of France in 1994) was a busy workshop for artists of the Palaeolithic age. They daubed, painted and possibly worshipped there for a good 20,000 years, give or take. But since a rockslide sealed off the entrance in the 8th millennium BC, business has been on the slow side.

It would have stayed like that, had Chauvet and his colleagues not been scouting the area, attentive to those rock-face draughts that are the cold breath of hidden caves. Once the site had been uncovered, the French government refused all filming requests, wary of the damage that could be inflicted by human contact. Then Herzog called. Here is a man who has persuaded hundreds of people to risk their lives and their sanity in the pursuit of his cinematic vision. Was there ever any answer open to the French but "oui"?

The plain wonder of the paintings in close-up, with hand-held lights providing shaky illumination, justifies the entire project. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Caveman's Delight: Herzog's Enigmatic Musings Have an Emotional Effect on Ryan Gilbey
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.