Are You an Effective Leader?

The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, April 2011 | Go to article overview

Are You an Effective Leader?


Regardless of our rank or assignment, we all are potential leaders. Most of us talk about, aspire to, learn of, and, at times, fail at leadership. You may picture it in your mind's eye but be unable to explain or describe leadership. We all know various types of leaders, including those we would follow into the worst of situations, expecting success. However, others we probably would not want even to accompany across the street.

The positive and negative attributes that encompass a leadership style vary just as we do. For some individuals, leadership comes naturally. Others must try many styles and approaches before finding the one that works for them. Some never may find the right fit. Ultimately, there are good, bad, and weak leaders.

All such personnel can be grouped into three categories: leaders, evil managers, and ineffective managers. (1) "Leaders tend to generate commitment in most people they supervise. They lead by example, both professionally and personally. Though they fail on occasion, overall they consistently discipline themselves to demonstrate recognized leadership behaviors in their dealings with others." (2) You will remember these leaders when you look back on your career as a police officer. Such high-quality leaders may have confronted you from time to time, but they also listened to you and knew more about you than, perhaps, some of your friends.

"Evil managers are the antithesis of their leader counterparts. They are consistently destructive to the organizational culture and to employees, and they are widely distrusted and despised throughout the agency. They are egotistical and self-centered, and they have a predatory perspective on others. They may have strong ethical and character problems and often engage in inappropriate behavior." (3) You will remember these individuals and swear that you never will treat others as they did.

"Ineffective managers ... are basically ethical and caring people like their leader counterparts; however, they do not consistently practice and demonstrate good leadership behavior with their subordinates. They arc not disliked by the rank and file, but neither are they respected. They are perceived by most as wishy-washy and inconsistent. Employees cannot trust them to stand behind them." (4) These individuals may know something about good leadership, but they cannot accomplish it. On a positive note, they basically are good people who can improve if they so desire. Such personnel may be new in their positions and have much to learn. Perhaps they have lost their way and, with proper guidance and support, can turn their leadership abilities around. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Are You an Effective Leader?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.