The Coming Balkan War; Hague Conviction of Croatian General Rekindles Designs for 'Greater Serbia'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 20, 2011 | Go to article overview

The Coming Balkan War; Hague Conviction of Croatian General Rekindles Designs for 'Greater Serbia'


Byline: Jeffrey Kuhner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Croatia is headed toward another war. The Balkans - again - will explode with violence. It is only a matter of time. And the so-called international community has been pivotal in stoking the flames of ethnic conflict.

Recently, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) based in The Hague, Netherlands, sentenced Croatian Gen. Ante Gotovina to 24 years in prison. The ICTY's ruling rightly has sparked angry protests across Croatia.

Gen. Gotovina has been convicted for having command responsibility over an August 1995 military campaign, known as Operation Storm, that effectively ended the Croat-Serbian war. The ICTY alleges that the Croatian general oversaw the expulsion of 100,000 ethnic Serbs and the murder of hundreds of civilians. According to the United Nations war crimes court, the campaign constituted a joint criminal enterprise.

The ICTY's verdict is preposterous and outrageous. Gen. Gotovina is not a war criminal; rather, he is a Croatian patriot and hero whose campaign restored Croatia's territorial integrity. Moreover, it delivered a decisive blow to the late Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic's dream of a Greater Serbia.

From 1991 until 1995, Milosevic's marauders rampaged across the region. He used the disintegration of Yugoslavia - a synthetic multinational state - to advance his goal of establishing a Great Serbian empire stretching from the Danube to the Adriatic. In Croatia, Serbian paramilitaries - aided and abetted by the Yugoslav army - waged a brutal war of aggression. The result: A third of Croatia's territory was annexed, more than 180,000 Croatians were ethnically cleansed, and nearly 20,000 civilians were murdered. Milosevic's aim was to unite the truncated parts of Croatia with the nearly 70 percent of territory his forces had carved out in neighboring Bosnia. Call it state-building through genocidal partition.

Operation Storm put a stop to all of this. Gen. Gotovina's army launched a U.S.-backed offensive that was a stunning success: Civilian casualties were minimized, the campaign lasted just three days, and the crushing defeat of the rebel Serbs eventually paved the way for the signing of the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords.

Moreover, numerous media outlets - The Washington Times, the Wall Street Journal, Newsweek and the Jerusalem Post - have investigated Operation Storm and have concluded that Gen. Gotovina is innocent of any wrongdoing. He never personally ordered or tolerated the commission of any crimes. In fact, the ICTY's prosecution was dismal on this point. It failed to show any kind of proof that Gen. Gotovina was responsible for orchestrating a criminal conspiracy. The reason is a simple one: He couldn't have.

The orders to evacuate the Serbian population from the so-called Krajina zone of occupation came from Belgrade several days before the commencement of Operation Storm. Milosevic, realizing he was facing a military humiliation, ordered Croatia's Serbs transferred to Bosnia and Kosovo to consolidate his revanchist gains there. …

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