Who's Your Diva?

By Setoodeh, Ramin | Newsweek, May 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Who's Your Diva?


Setoodeh, Ramin, Newsweek


Byline: Ramin Setoodeh

Just as J. Lo rises, here comes Christina to steal the spotlight.

Her movie career was basically over. Her music made tweens yawn. She was so jinxed, she even fell onstage in front of millions. Then she signed a deal to appear on a talent show, and the buzz began again about how wonderful she looked.

Three months after Jennifer Lopez turned to American Idol to fix her broken career, Christina Aguilera is trying the same trick. She debuts this week on NBC's The Voice, which is based on a Dutch hit talent show where celebrities judge contestants without seeing what they look like. "There's a much happier, confident woman portrayed on the show than you ever thought," says Carson Daly, The Voice's version of Ryan Seacrest.

Viewers are already relishing the prospect of a diva face-off, as NBC tries to win over Idol fans with a younger panel of star judges that includes Cee Lo Green, Adam Levine, and Blake Shelton. Underscoring the potential rivalry: both J. Lo and Aguilera will themselves be singing on their respective shows.

On American Idol, J. Lo quickly shed her frosty-diva persona to become television's emoter in chief. She nurtures the contestants, laughing amiably between sugarcoated critiques. She even cries on cue when the contestants are voted off. It's a far cry from the tantrum-throwing clotheshorse the tabloids tormented.

Mark Burnett, who's worked with J. Lo before and is now executive producer of The Voice, has only nice things to say about the competition. …

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