"I'm Not a Punchbag-I Have Feelings": A Year Ago, Nick Clegg Was the Star of the Party Leaders' TV Debates and the Kingmaker of the New Government. Now He Is Being Hanged in Effigy and Called a "Tragic Figure" by the Opposition. but Can the Tim Henman of British Politics Make a Comeback?

By Khan, Jemima | New Statesman (1996), April 11, 2011 | Go to article overview

"I'm Not a Punchbag-I Have Feelings": A Year Ago, Nick Clegg Was the Star of the Party Leaders' TV Debates and the Kingmaker of the New Government. Now He Is Being Hanged in Effigy and Called a "Tragic Figure" by the Opposition. but Can the Tim Henman of British Politics Make a Comeback?


Khan, Jemima, New Statesman (1996)


Nick Clegg and I smile genially at each other across the table of a standard-class train carriage. He is on his way to his constituency in Sheffield to talk about manufacturing. Pale-faced, pale-eyed and so tired he appears taxidermied, he looks like he could do with a holiday, except he's just had one--skiing in Davos with his children as the Libyan crisis escalated (for which he was lambasted).

Nick Clegg is the Tim Henman of politics: a decent man for whom Cleggmania represented the peak of his career, his Henman Hill moment. Then he became the Deputy Prime Minister and, shortly after, an effigy.

The carefree, cloud-cuckoo days of opposition, when he had a platform and little criticism, are long gone. At last year's Liberal Democrat spring conference, a fresh-looking and ebullient Clegg had gesticulated and boomed: "We see the same old broken promises. No wonder people feel let down." A year on, he was less combative, more ambivalent. His many critics pointed to his own broken promises and let-down voters.

Clegg concedes that it has been a "very sharp transition". "Of course it has had a dramatic effect on how I'm perceived, the kind of dilemmas I have to face," he says. "I don't even pretend we can occupy the Lib Dem holier-than-thou, hands-entirely-clean-and-entirely-empty-type stance. No, we are getting our hands dirty, and inevitably and totally understandably we are being accused of being just like any other politicians."

His point--and it seems a fair one--is that the British public voted, no one party won and that coalition government, by definition, is a compromise. "A whole lot of things are happening that would just never in a month of Sundays have happened without the Lib Dems there," he says. The morning of our meeting, he claims to have "squeezed out of [George] Osborne" a promise of a green investment bank, not simply a fund. "We've done more on liberty and privacy," he adds, "in the past ten months than Labour did in the pastry years."

All this has done little to dilute the vitriol of his opponents. John Prescott has likened him to Jedward, the risible and tuneless twins from The X Factor. Ed Miliband has called him "a tragic figure", one too toxic to share a platform with ahead of the referendum on the Alternative Vote. Clegg insists that none of this bothers him. "I see it exactly for what it is. [Ed] is a perfectly nice guy but he has a problem, which is that he's not in control of his own party, so he constantly has to keep his troops happy and he thinks that ranting and raving at me is the way to do it."

Since joining the government, and in particular since his U-turn on university tuition fees, Clegg has had dog mess posted through his door and been spat at in the street. It must upset him. "No, well look, I'm a human being, I'm not a punchbag--I've of course got feelings."

He pauses. "Actually, the curious thing is that the more you become a subject of admiration or loathing, the more you're examined under a microscope, the distance seems to open up between who you really are and the portrayals that people impose on you ... I increasingly see these images of me, cardboard cut-outs that get ever more outlandish ... One thing I've very quickly learned is that if you wake up every morning worrying about what's in the press, you would go completely and utterly potty."

After ten months in government, he has a guardedness that did not exist in the days when he told Piers Morgan he'd had roughly 30 lovers. These days he is tightly managed. I have already had a pre-interview briefing with one adviser, and now Clegg's version of Andy Coulson, who is sitting to his right, is busy taking written notes of our interview, as well as recording it. When Clegg gets sidetracked, he prompts him, head down, pen poised over notebook, deadpan: "You were talking about what you've achieved ..."

Everyone seems painfully aware that my task as interviewer is to catch him out, to get him to say the wrong thing. …

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"I'm Not a Punchbag-I Have Feelings": A Year Ago, Nick Clegg Was the Star of the Party Leaders' TV Debates and the Kingmaker of the New Government. Now He Is Being Hanged in Effigy and Called a "Tragic Figure" by the Opposition. but Can the Tim Henman of British Politics Make a Comeback?
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