Woodrow Wilson Center Welcomes New President

The Wilson Quarterly, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

Woodrow Wilson Center Welcomes New President


On February 8, The Woodrow Wilson Center's board of trustees ushered in a new era with the appointment of Representative Jane Harman (D-Calif.) as the Center's director, president, and CEO. Harman resigned her long-held congressional seat, telling reporters that the opportunity to lead and shape the direction of the country's premier policy incubator--one with international reach and influence--is a thrilling next step for me."

Like her predecessor, Lee H. Hamilton, who represented Indiana's Ninth Congressional District in the House of Representatives for more than three decades before becoming director of the Wilson Center, Harman brings an insider's understanding of the ways the Wilson Center's offerings-public debate, research, and scholarship-can find traction in Washington and beyond. Hamilton's "centered, principled, and pragmatic" leadership of the Wilson Center will serve as an inspiration and guide, she said.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Raised in Los Angeles, Harman displayed from an early age the enthusiasm for policy that would eventually bring her to the Wilson Center. She attended the 1960 Democratic Convention and witnessed the nomination of John E Kennedy for president. While working as a Smith College organizer for Young Citizens for Johnson in 1964, the high-spirited teenager wrote to her parents, 'Tin flying! NEVER have I been so sure of my love for politics, for organizing, for leading--what a week! ... I'm one of those freaks of nature they call super-energetic" She was passionate about learning as well: She graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1966, and earned her JD from Harvard Law School, where she was one of several dozen women in a class of 550. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Woodrow Wilson Center Welcomes New President
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.