Rediscovering African Geographies: From the Great African Kings and Empires from 3000 BC to the Complex Trade Networks and Migration of Africans within the Continent and across the World, a New Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) Exhibition Uses Maps, Photographs and Literature from Its Collections to Travel through Africa's Rich History

Geographical, April 2011 | Go to article overview

Rediscovering African Geographies: From the Great African Kings and Empires from 3000 BC to the Complex Trade Networks and Migration of Africans within the Continent and across the World, a New Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) Exhibition Uses Maps, Photographs and Literature from Its Collections to Travel through Africa's Rich History


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Rediscovering African Geographies shows, from an African perspective, how culture, international relations, language and conflict have shaped the geography we know today. It reveals often neglected stories and how these records of African societies, cultures and landscapes helped shape and inform European views of Africa and its people.

The exhibition, which runs from 22 March to 28 April, has been created in cooperation with numerous African community partners, representing the Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Sierra Leone.

'Behind every map are people and cultures, and 'we knew there was an opportunity with this exhibition to reclaim forgotten histories, address misinformation and explain how changing geographies have shaped Africa over the centuries,' said Zagba Oyortey, an adviser to this exhibition. 'Most importantly, we wanted to open up a discussion about how Africa is perceived today.'

'Africa's rich natural resources have been at the foundation of its links with the wider world, creating trade routes and hubs--many of which are documented on the maps used in this exhibition--that reached out beyond Africa,' said the exhibition coordinator, Vandana Patel. 'As well as the movement of resources, this exhibition explores how the distribution and movement of African languages has had an important legacy on the identity of different African communities and nations. …

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Rediscovering African Geographies: From the Great African Kings and Empires from 3000 BC to the Complex Trade Networks and Migration of Africans within the Continent and across the World, a New Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) Exhibition Uses Maps, Photographs and Literature from Its Collections to Travel through Africa's Rich History
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