Pushing Art and Culture outside Square Museum Walls

Manila Bulletin, May 2, 2011 | Go to article overview

Pushing Art and Culture outside Square Museum Walls


MANILA, Philippines -- A date place. A hub of activity. A venue for people of all ages and demographics. These are the things Ayala Museum director Guillermo Luz envisions for the museum ever since he took the helm of the institution last year. He wanted to make the museum livelier. He wanted to bring art out there. He wanted new audiences to come in to soak themselves in various art forms, and get them to renew their interest in our country's rich history and heritage. And it looks like Luz has been calling all the right shots (including spamming this writer to death of e-mails about the museum's upcoming programs and exhibitions, but this writer isn't complaining, though) to achieve the challenges he has set for himself and the museum staff.

"My concept for the museum is to not just be a place for exhibiting art. When I came in to the Ayala Museum and had my very first meeting with the staff, we sat down and talked about the things we have done. But more importantly, I posed these questions: 'What's our identity?' 'What's our purpose in life as a museum?' We need to be an institution that captures art history and culture as museums are supposed to," Luz shares.

Captured art history and culture the museum did and in a very fresh and dynamic fashion. Last year, the museum partnered with organizations such as the Purita-Kalaw Ledesma Foundation, the Filipino Heritage Festival, and Ninoy and Cory Aquino Foundation in showcasing collections of historical and cultural significance. More exhibitions of painting, sculpture, and installation art were also staged last year, and along with them are intimate lecture series dubbed 'Conversations in Art' made to "peer into the depth and significance of featured artist, and the publication of exhibition catalogues."

More than these, however, Luz has also introduced "several layers" into the museum's creative outreach through a number of lecture series called 'DesignTalks' featuring professionals from various design fields and 'History Comes Alive!' featuring noted historian Ambeth Ocampo.

"Lectures can be exciting, but with that said, we had to pick the lecturers very carefully. All of who has been put to sleep in school through lectures? I didn't want that. I said, 'Let's go and have fun and exciting lectures that will be, if we talk about Philippine history, animated and imaginative. We should have lectures that can make us travel back in time so that we can really feel the history and get a different appreciation of it," Luz says.

Thinking that design is seemingly an ignored field in the country, Luz decided to tap world-class designers for the first series of the museum's DesignTalks. They had furniture designer Kenneth Cobonpue, jeweler Anne Pamintuan, light designer Florian Theuer, furniture designers Budji Layug and Royal Pineda, architect Ed Calma, fashion designer Rajo Laurel, artist Rachy Cuna, and milliner Mich Dulce as guest lecturers last year.

Luz tells, "We tried to make each lecture different and fun. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pushing Art and Culture outside Square Museum Walls
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.