Bibliography

By Strange, David | Thomas Wolfe Review, Annual 2010 | Go to article overview

Bibliography


Strange, David, Thomas Wolfe Review


"Bibliography" is a list of published works that focus on Thomas Wolfe. Some entries include a brief annotation. An asterisk (*) indicates an item that appeared before the previous issue of the Thomas Wolfe Review but that became known to us only recently. More information about many of the entries in "Bibliography" is provided in "Notes."

Books

* Holman, C. Hugh. Three Modes of Modern Southern Fiction: Ellen Glasgow, William Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2008. Mercer University Lamar Memorial Lectures 9. Orig. published 1966.

Kennedy, Richard S., ed. Beyond Love and Loyalty: The Letters of Thomas Wolfe and Elizabeth Nowell[,] Together with "No More Rivers": A Story by Thomas Wolfe. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010. An "Enduring Editions" reprint; book orig. published 1983.

Koegler, Ronald R. Chasing the Stargazer: With Help from Luigi Pirandello, Nucky Johnson, and Thomas Wolfe. Bloomington: iUniverse, forthcoming. Novel scheduled for publication in January 2011.

Wolfe, Thomas. Oktoberfest. Ed. Horst Maria Lauinger. Trans. Irma Wehrli. Munchen: Manesse-Random House, 2010. Contains Wolfe's 1937 short story in German and English (5-24 / 61-78).

** Lauinger, Horst Maria. "Thomas Wolfes Wiesn-Leidenschaft." Nachwort. 41-59. / "Thomas Wolfe's Passion for the Munich Beer Festival." Afterword. Trans. Monika Schmalz. 91-108.

** Wolfe, Thomas. "'Munchen hat mich beinahe umgebracht': Eine Brief an Aline Bernstein." 25-40. / "'Munich almost killed me': A Letter to Aline Bernstein." 79-90. Excerpt from Wolfe's 4 October 1928 letter to Aline Bernstein (see The Letters of Thomas Wolfe, 142-48).

--. You Can't Go Home Again. Oxford: Benediction Classics, 2010. Print-on-demand publisher; Wolfe's novel orig. published 1940.

Periodicals

The Ledger 13.1 (Jan. 2010). Thomas Wolfe Memorial.

** "A Note about the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Committee." 1.

The Ledger 13.2 (July 2010). Thomas Wolfe Memorial.

** "Maxwell Perkins: The Man behind Look Homeward, Angel." 1+.

The Proceedings and Membership List of the Thomas Wolfe Society (2009-10). Thomas Wolfe Society. "The Thirty-First Annual Meeting: Paris, France: May 21-24, 2009." / "The Thirty-Second Annual Meeting: Greenville, South Carolina: May 28-30, 2010."

** "A Weekend in Paris: Images of the Thirty-First Annual Meeting." 1-10.

** "A Weekend in Greenville: Images of the Thirty-Second Annual Meeting." 11-20.

The Thomas Wolfe Review 33.1-2 (2009). Thomas Wolfe Society.

** Carter, Albert Howard, III. "Mr. Mason's Request." 127-33. Winner, 2009 North Carolina Writers' Network Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize.

** Clark, James W., Jr. Rev. of The Web and the Root: A Selection from The Web and the Rock, by Thomas Wolfe. 142-44.

** D'Andrea, Rena. "Passage to Normandy: Voyages of the SS Thomas Wolfe." 107-113. "Belles Lettres."

** Davis, David A. Rev. of A Backward Glance: The Southern Renascence, the Autobiographical Epic, and the Classical Legacy, by Joseph Millichap. 144-47.

** Dawson, Jon. "Look Outward, Thomas: Social Criticism as Unifying Element in You Can't Go Home Again." 48-66.

** Doll, Mary Aswell. "Beyond Myth and Memory: Ghostwriting Wolfe." 83-92.

** Godwin, Rebecca. "You Can't Go Home Again: Does Nazism Really Transform Wolfe's Romanticism?" 24-31.

** Hensley, Jan G. "The Journey Down." 104-106. "Belles Lettres."

** --. "The Last Wolverine." 121-123. "Belles Lettres."

** Hensley, Jan G., and David Strange. "Introduction." 93-96. "Ted Mitchell: In Memoriam."

** Hovis, George. "Beyond the Lost Generation: The Death of Egotism in You Can't Go Home Again." 32-47.

** Joyner, Nancy C. Rev. of The Whore, by Thomas Wolfe. 147-49.

** Magi, Aldo P "'He Was a Friend of Mine'" A Personal Tribute to Ted Mitchell. …

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