Communist Influence in the Mideast Uprisings: Though Pro-Communist Groups May Not Have Initiated the Uprisings in the Middle East, Evidence Shows That They Are Well Situated to Exploit the Unrest for Their Own Ends

By Gomez, Christian | The New American, April 4, 2011 | Go to article overview

Communist Influence in the Mideast Uprisings: Though Pro-Communist Groups May Not Have Initiated the Uprisings in the Middle East, Evidence Shows That They Are Well Situated to Exploit the Unrest for Their Own Ends


Gomez, Christian, The New American


In an interview with the Tokyo Nichi Nichi Shimbun, on July 4, 1925, Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin was asked if he thought that the revolutionary turmoil in China, India, Persia, Egypt, and other Eastern countries was a sign that the Western powers had dug themselves graves in the East and would end up being buried there.

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"Yes, I do," Stalin answered, before going on to assert that these countries of Asia and the Middle East constitute a rear threat that will bring about a "revolutionary crisis in the West." The West will be "attacked on two sides--in the rear as well as in front," he said, and "will be forced to admit that it is doomed."

In the decades that followed, Stalin and his Kremlin successors did their best to insure that the Middle East would indeed become the graveyard that would doom the United States and the non-communist countries of the West. An army of Soviet agents, advisors, agitators, propagandists, and terrorist trainers were dispatched throughout the Middle East to set it aflame. Since 1990 and the apparent collapse of communism, it has become fashionable to consider concerns of a continuing Marxist-Leninist threat in the region passe, a relic of the "Cold War mentality." After all, communist ideology and organization have been supplanted by Islamist ideology and organization, right?

But did the elaborate networks established throughout the Middle East during the Soviet era disappear? Or do the dire words spoken by Stalin in 1925 also bespeak a relevance to the recent events that are roiling the Arab states of the Mediterranean from Rabat in Morocco to the Suez Canal in Egypt, to Amman in Jordan, and along the Arabian peninsula from Yemen to Oman and Bahrain?

Commentators on both the Left and Right, from Chris Matthews at MSNBC to William Kristol at the Weekly Standard, have all taken jabs at Glenn Beck and Art Thompson, CEO of The John Birch Society, for challenging the conventional wisdom and daring to point out to the oblivious what the mainstream media is still either ignorant of or just unwilling to acknowledge--that these revolutions demonstrate an unmistakable Islamo-communist connection.

In the case of Egypt, particularly, a lot of attention has been placed on fears of an Iranian-style revolutionary takeover by the Muslim Brotherhood. These fears are not without merit, but, unfortunately, are mistakenly taken as proof of an Islamic revolution, because the word Muslim is in its name. This sort of simplistic explanation ignores the true nature and history of the Muslim Brotherhood and because of such is folly to a meticulous understanding of the revolution. Any reasonable analysis of the socio-political tumult in the Middle East must factor in the very prominent ongoing role played by the various communist parties and coalitions, which have the most disciplined and organized cadres, as well as decades of practice at orchestrating "spontaneous" demonstrations--or commandeering genuine grass-roots efforts started by others.

Founded in 1928, the Muslim Brotherhood's unholy alliance with communism stretches as far back as the 1940s and '50s, during the early days of the Cold War, when Stalin had his eyes set on the revolutionary communist takeover of Egypt. It is true that the communists and the Muslim Brotherhood have also battled each other, but the various factions of the communist and socialist parties also battle amongst themselves--and then come together to battle their common enemies.

In November 1951, in an article entitled "Detailed Stalin Plan Is Coming True," AP foreign news analyst William L. Ryan noted in the Telegraph-Herald: "Communists have infiltrated heavily in the Moslem brotherhood, now in the forefront of the chaos in Egypt after having been suppressed for some time."

In October 1954, upon the signing of the Anglo-Egyptian agreement on Britain's troop withdrawal from the Suez Canal zone, communist and Muslim Brotherhood protesters look to the streets of Cairo, inciting acts of violence as they celebrated. …

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