Green for a Day. Her Majesty in Ireland History Is Made

The Mirror (London, England), May 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Green for a Day. Her Majesty in Ireland History Is Made


Byline: CATHAL McMAHON

THERE was a cheer for Queen Elizabeth II when she stepped out of her plane wearing a "St Patrick's green" coat and hat yesterday.

It was 100 years since a reigning British Monarch visited what is now the Republic.

But shortly after 11.50am yesterday that historical taboo was broken when Flight BAE146 touched down in Casement Aerodrome Baldonnel, Dublin.

Group Captain Tim Hewitt held a Royal Standard flag from the window of the cockpit as the plane taxied along the empty runways.

Just 10 minutes later the Queen emerged from the jet dressed in a jade green patterned dress. Over this she was wearing a green coat and hat.

Her dress and coat were designed by Stewart Parvin and hat by Rachel Trevor-Morgan.

In the symbolism of her first official visit, the Queen's green dress and hat took much of the attention.

She looked genuinely delighted to be in Ireland while her husband Prince Philip laughed as he chatted to the visiting party.

Her arrival at Casement Aerodrome featured the traditional introductions and handshakes, as officials waited patiently in line for the royal.

The Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore, his wife Carol, Deputy Chief of Staff of the Irish Defence Forces Major General David Ashe, the Irish Ambassador Bobby McDonagh and the British Ambassador Julian King were there to greet her.

After a short chat with the delegation the monarch walked up the red carpet, past an Air Corps honour guard, and was greeted by eight-year-old Rachel Fox.

The Dublin schoolgirl presented the Queen with a posy of flowers which she accepted graciously.

Security has been extremely tight around Casement Aerodrome for weeks and up to 500 army personnel had secured the location over the weekend. …

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